Presentation to the Southern and Eastern Metropolitan Regions

On the 25th of July I  presented the North and West Melbourne Data Integration Project to the Southern Metropolitan Region (SMR)  and Eastern Metropolitan Region  staff and the SMR Servicing Growing Communities Network. Sandy Austin Director of the Southern and Eastern Metropolitan regions (and former champion for the health project) has since sent a message to say   “The availability and utilisation of data that you presented  through the demonstration projects has stimulated  thinking about opportunities and potential application within and across the work of the Southern and Eastern regions. The Walkability tools are of particular interest to our work in planning and developing communities of the South East Growth Corridor, the opportunities the tool presents  for local government is exciting. As discussed in the meeting we are keen to explore the use of  regional  work as demonstration projects, particularly  around landfill site planning. “  We look forward to working further with the Southern and Eastern Regions and further testing the value of the demonstration projects in real life situations.

 

City of Melton – Local data strategy

On the 15th of July Jack Barton and I went to the City of Melton to showcase the AURIN portal and data within the portal as well as to understnad more about the City of Melton local data strategy which aims to engage all Councils business units to deliver reliable and comperable sets of local data. The City of Melbourne expressed interest in improving the platforms for data sharing and participating further in the North West Melbourne Data Integration project both through the provision of data as well as working to improve automated data feeds through the Victorian Data Hub currently hosted within DEPI.

Local Government walkability strategies and the next steps in developing common approaches for the future.

On the 20th of June the Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV) convened its second walkability workshop. The workshop opened with a series of presentations. The workshop was attended by some 40 persons from local government and the discussions highlighted the need for a Local Government Walkability Tool Box. Further information relating to the discussions are available from the draft minutes attached:  Walkability – MAV_Workshop No2

Demonstrator 4: Health Project Champions Meeting

On the 5th of June the two project champions Professor Jane Gunn and Steve Ballard met with the project team. Using the health demonstrator tool Jane quickly identified the areas within the Inner North West Medicare Region which contained a combination of high disadvantage (according with SEIFA), High diabetes prevalence and High levels of depression and without access to GP locations. Steve and Jane agreed that the tool has the potential to provide an evidence base for decision making. To test the usability of the tool the department of health will convene a user group meeting of people within Medicare locals along with a planning scenario and test the ability of end users to problem solve using the tool.

Over the next week the geographic coverage of the tool will be expanded from the Inner North West to include the Northern and Western Medicare Local Regions.

 

 

Walkability Deliverable #8 – Final Product Post

Product name
Agent-based modelling tool

Primary users
Urban, transport, and social planners, and urban planning and public health researchers and practitioners

Synopsis
This agent-based modelling tool has the capacity to be not only a powerful urban design tool that builds on existing walkability measures, but also an influential advocacy tool. The purpose of the tool was to yield a more accurate understanding of how neighbourhood walkability is associated with access and permeability, and to develop an interactive on-line tool for researchers and planners to modify neighbourhood walkability to enhance access to features of interest. As such, this work will provide not only innovative tools to investigate how neighbourhood walkability is related to amenity access, but enables different planning scenarios to be tested prior to developing new or retrofitting older areas. It is anticipated that planners will apply these tools to diverse areas in Melbourne’s North West Metropolitan region and beyond, prior to building infrastructure or when seeking to modify existing sites.

Instructions for use:

It is anticipated that urban planners will use the tool prior to developing and/or retrofitting built environments, and that the research community will model built environment and health data using this tool. The vector editing capabilities allow for the rapid testing of ‘what if’ scenarios such the introduction of a node of interest, pedestrian linkage, or a new pedestrian crossing, with data generated allowing quantifiable comparisons in addition to animated simulation which can be used in the advocacy of such interventions. This tool can also be integrated with the walkability tool (hosted within the AURIN website) to examine the walkability of any given environment, and how access can be improved.

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Housing Demonstrator Deliverable #8 – Final Product Post

Introduction

A web based analysis tool-kit has been developed to support housing analysis. The tool is developed in its current form to focus on the analysis of housing in the North West corridor of Melbourne. It actually has the capacity to be extended and applied in any jurisdiction, provided the necessary data integration component is adequately implemented. The purpose of this tool was to provide better insights into the understanding of variables important for the assessment of housing affordability. The tool is intended to achieve 3 things: to identify developable land parcels/properties that have potentials for residential development, to analyse land administration processes that impact approval of development right, and to understand demand factors’ (income, household size, mortgage repayment etc) influence on housing supply.

The primary users of this tool include: Strategic and Statutory Planners, Transport Planners, researchers and practitioners

Instructions for use

This tool assists in the analyses of a combination of potential and constraint factors to identify land that has potential for residential development.  It also assesses the efficiency of development assessment processes.  The first module focuses on the identification of development potential. The requirement to calculate and determine the Development Potential Index (DPI) is closely related with the success of linking planning dataset with valuation datasets. DPI measures lands that are under-capitalised in the grey field areas (established inner and middle ring suburbs).

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Understanding Walkability and Public Transport Using Ped-Catch Key Apps Deliverable #5 – Deployed, tested and documented software system

The Application
The purpose of this tool was to yield a more accurate understanding of how neighbourhood walkability is associated with access and permeability, and to develop an interactive on-line tool for researchers and planners to modify neighbourhood walkability to enhance access to features of interest. As such, this tool will provide not only innovative tools to investigate how neighbourhood walkability is related to amenity access, but enables different planning scenarios to be tested prior to developing new or retrofitting older areas. It is anticipated that planners will apply these tools to diverse areas in Melbourne’s North West Metropolitan region and beyond, prior to building infrastructure or when seeking to modify existing sites.

A strength of this tool is its spatial data flexibility; that is, different users have the ability to upload different data sources at different scales. In order to do this, the tool has been developed with a spatial data hierarchy in mind. Fine-grained data are optimal, but inputs extend too coarser-scale (e.g., SA2-level) and open-access (e.g., Walk Score) data sources. In this way, a variety of different end users are able to utilise the tool either using their own data, or those supplied through the AURIN portal or other open-access sources. Currently, standard datasets used for the tool include the road network, features of interest (e.g., schools, public transport nodes), and traffic lights. Depending on end user access to other spatial data, additional spatial layers can also be incorporated into the tool. These include footpaths, traffic volume, and topography. Including such additional spatial data layers enhances the accuracy of the tool. There is also scope to add in more subjective features of the environment, such as shade, crime and incivilities, and aesthetics.

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Housing Project Deliverable #5 – Deployed, tested and documented software system

The Housing Project Application

A browser based analysis tool-kit has been developed to support housing analysis. The study are for the tool focusses on the analysis of housing in the North West corridor of Melbourne. It actually has the capacity to be extended and applied in any jurisdiction, provided the necessary data integration component is adequately implemented.

The purpose of this tool was to provide better insights into the understanding of variables important for the assessment of housing supply. The tool is intended to achieve 3 things: to identify developable land parcels/properties that have potentials for residential development, to analyse land administration processes that impact approval of development right, and to understand demand factors’ (income, household size, mortgage repayment etc) influence on housing affordability.

Given the number of variables required for consideration in housing supply analysis and the variability of potential response for decision, and considering the contextual issues peculiar to different geographies, the tool is designed to be flexible to accommodate different scenarios such as: determining the potential use of properties, accessibility to facilities, planning controls and efficiencies of development assessment. It is anticipated that Strategic and Statutory Planners at state and local government levels will find the tool very useful in making evidence informed decisions about efficient and effective location of uses and allocation of spaces for residential development in Melbourne, especially in the North-West corridor. It is also anticipated that it will guide policy makers regarding decisions that affect greenfield , greyfield and brownfield developments.

Different levels and hierarchies of geospatial and textual datasets are compiled and integrated as bases for the analyses. Currently, datasets used for the tool include: Valuer General Data on Property information, Public Transport route network through the Department of Sustainability & Environment (DSE), Facilities data extracted from VICMAP – Features of Interest, Planning Permit Activity Reporting System (PPARS) from Department of Planning And Community Development and Overlay Controls data from VICMAP – Planning Scheme Overlay.

 

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Walkability – Demonstration of Value

On the 24th of May Billie Giles-Corti presented the Walkability project at the Congress of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity held in Ghent Belgium, 22 – 25 May 2013.
The purpose of the presentation was to demonstrate the application of the Walkability tool for testing different built environment scenarios and their impact on neighbourhood walkability. This presentation hass been really well received and the team already have some international researchers who are wanting to collaborate and access the tool. Below are the powerpoint slides which provide the context of the presentation along with a movie which demonstrations the tool in action. Further information relating to the conference is available through the following link: https://secure.isbnpa.org/annual-meeting/index.cfm?

Presentation Slides

Housing Project Demonstration of Value

In this demonstration Professor Abbas Rajabifard, Head of Infrastructure Engineering and Director of the Centre for Spatial Data Infrastructures and Land Administration showcases the value of a housing assessment tool which can be used to assess the availability of land based on a Development Potential Index (DPI). It is important to recognise that underpinning this tool is the fact that North West Melbourne is one of the fastest growing areas in Melbourne, and indeed Australia. The Victoria In Future Population forecasts show that the projected population change between 2011 and 2021 in is going to grow from 1,662,500 to 2,183,700 (31%) requiring approximately 260,000 dwellings in which to live (DPCD, 2012). One important coponent of housing affordability is the fact that unless housing supply in the region is able to match the demand prices will inevitably increase. It is important to also mention that other costs associated with housing such as interest rates, stamp duty and schemes such as developer contributions also impact the price of housing and inturn the ability for people to rent and purchase property in the area as well as meet their needs.