Readings Online Available Again

Readings Online has been successfully upgraded and is available again for staff and students to access subject readings.

New features have been added that will make uploading subject readings and managing reading lists easier.   To learn more about these new feature visit the website, consult the updated Readings Online User Guide or register to attend an information session.

It is now easier for staff to roll-over, or reactivate, their reading list for a new teaching period as readings do not have to be rolled over individually.  Information on how to copy and create a new reading list for a teaching period is available in the Readings Online User Guide .

Semester 2 subjects that are not already using Readings Online are encouraged to upload their readings now to be ready for the start of semester.  All subjects must be copyright compliant and using Readings Online is the only way to ensure that a subject fulfils all copyright requirements.

If you are having difficulties accessing Readings Online, please restart your browser and clear your cache in the first instance.  If you continue to experience difficulties after taking these steps, please contact us.


Save the Internet – Tell the European Parliament to stop the harmful copyright proposal

I saw this this morning from Creative Commons – not really the best way to tackle piracy and promote innovation.

Tell the European Parliament to stop the harmful copyright proposal

European lawmakers are drafting new copyright rules that will require online platforms to automatically monitor and filter all user-uploaded content. Their intention is to stop copyright infringement, but the reality will go so far beyond that it will risk breaking the internet.

This means that nearly every platform — from Instagram to YouTube to SoundCloud to Flickr — will have to review every single uploaded file for copyright infringements before it is allowed to go online. Such a system would be so expensive that only huge companies would be able to join the market, and it would surely flag tons of perfectly harmless and non-infringing content.

The draft law would also allow press publishers to demand fees for linking to headlines and snippets. This will kill news linking on the web. How do we know? It already failed in Spain and Germany. The new “link tax” would drastically disrupt the free flow of information online.

These copyright proposals will break the internet as we know it.  Go to https://saveyourinternet.eu to find out more and what you can do to prevent this.

Source: Creative Commons CC BY.

Photo by David Iliff on Wikimedia Commons. CC BY-SA 3.0


Preparing Subject Readings Lists for Semester 2

Semester 2 subjects that are not yet using Readings Online should upload their readings using the self-service option in Readings Online.  Readings Online supports all formats of readings materials – both print and electronic.  Staff can upload:

  • Journal articles, conferences papers etc.
  • Book chapters and links to whole ebooks
  • Sheet music and dramatic works, such as plays and film and telescripts
  • Images
  • Sound recordings and films

Readings Online manages copyright compliance and should be used to provide copies of subject readings, such as journals articles and book chapters, to students via the LMS. All subjects must be copyright compliant and using Readings Online is the only way to ensure that a subject fulfils all copyright requirements.

Some copyright restrictions apply and readings will need to be checked by Readings Online staff for copyright compliance.  Staff should upload their readings as soon as possible before the start of semester to ensure that all readings are available in time for the start of the teaching period.  Information on how to upload readings is available in the Readings Online User Manual.  Staff can also attend a Readings Online information session to learn how to use Readings Online.  Sessions are scheduled throughout June and July.  Register here.

Subjects that used Readings Online in Semester 2 2017 will need to review and roll-over their readings to reactivate them and make them available for students.  When readings are rolled over, most readings will be reactivated immediately. However, some readings containing PDF files may need a further copyright check. As such, teaching staff should aim to roll over readings as soon as possible before the start of semester to ensure that all readings are available in time for the start of the teaching period.  Information on how to rollover your subject is available in the Readings Online User Manual.

Please note that Readings Online will be unavailable Wednesday 4 July 2018 as the system is being upgraded.  During this period, staff will not be able to access Readings Online to view, create or modify their readings lists.  Students will also not be able to view or download their readings. As part of the upgrade, new features will be available to make uploading subject readings and managing reading lists easier.  Further information about the upgrade and new features is available on the Readings Online website.

Image from Pixabay


Readings Online Unavailable for Upgrade 4 July 2018

Update

Readings Online has been successfully upgraded and is available again for staff and students to access subject readings.

If you are having difficulties accessing Readings Online, please restart your browser and clear your cache
in the first instance.  If you continue to experience difficulties after taking these steps, please contact us.

 

Readings Online will be unavailable Wednesday 4 July 2018.  During this period, staff will not be able to access Readings Online to view, create or modify their readings lists.  Students will also not be able to view or download their readings. As part of the upgrade, new features will be available to make uploading subject readings and managing reading lists easier.  New features include:

  • A simpler process for reusing items in your reading list for a new teaching period.
  • Multiple reading lists  – have different lists for different teaching periods, e.g. Semester 1/Intensive.
  • Apply a teaching period or custom dates to the whole reading list, rather than entering for each reading.
  • Add music, sound recordings, films and images to your reading list (copyright permitting).
  • Improved features for managing readings lists including the ability to hide readings from students.
  • Student view – preview what your students will see.
  • Removal of the unit library (we will migrate these resources for you).

To find out more about the new features visit, New features in Readings Online.  Alternatively, you can attend an information session during June and July. View session details and register.

We have tried to select a day and time for the upgrade that will have minimal disruption for staff and students.  If you need access to Readings Online during this time, please contact us to discuss alternative arrangements.  Other modules and content areas of the Learning Management System will not be affected by this system upgrade.

Full details of the upgrade are available on the Readings Online website.

 

Image from Pixabay

 


Changes to the Copyright Act – Information for Staff

In 2017, amendments were made to the Copyright Act. The amendments covered four key areas:

  • The statutory licences for educational purposes – which we rely on to make copyright material available to students, for example via Readings Online.
  • Providing material in accessible formats to staff and students with disabilities.
  • The preservation of material held in Library, Archives and Cultural collections.
  • The duration of copyright in unpublished works.

The amendments simplify existing provisions, making it easier for staff to comply with copyright requirements when using copyright material for these purposes.

Staff are encouraged to attend an information session in April to find out more about the amendments and how it will affect them.

Image credits (clockwise from top left DariuszSankowskiJag kan känna dina tankar by Stefan Malmesjö  Licenced under CC BY, Gellinger, Cocoparisienne All images licenced under CCO, unless indicated.


LMS and Readings Online unavailable Monday 18th December

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The Learning Management System (LMS) and Readings Online will be unavailable during the scheduled LMS maintenance window on Monday 18th December 6.00am – 5.00pm. We apologise for the inconvenience this may cause.

We are encouraging staff and students to download any material required from Readings Online before the shutdown.  Staff and students will still be able to access digital content such as ebooks and journal articles via the Library catalogue and Discovery.  Simple instructions on how to do this are available from:

How to Access eBooks when Readings Online is Unavailable

How to Access Journal Articles when Readings Online is Unavailable

Please note this will only apply where Readings Online links to an ebook or a journal article that is available electronically via the Library’s databases.  If Readings Online links to a pdf of a print book chapter or journal article, access to the pdf will not be available and the pdf will need to be downloaded before LMS shutdown period.

The self-service function that allows staff to upload their subject readings to Readings Online will also be unavailable during the shutdown.

If you have any questions about this or need assistance please contact us at readings-online@unimelb.edu.au

Image credit – Detour by Nicolas Nova  88x31


Finding Creative Commons Images

It can sometimes be quite difficult to locate high-quality images online that can be used without either risking infringement or having to seek permission from a copyright owner (which can be very time-consuming and potentially expensive!). Luckily, Creative Commons licenses make it far easier to identify suitable images, as these licenses clearly spell out the different ways in which the material can and cannot be used (for example, whether or not an image can be used for commercial purposes). A number of popular online image sources such as Flickr and Google can be filtered to show only Creative Commons images, and can also be limited even further to specific Creative Commons license types.

To find out more about how to apply these filters, please check out the following updated guides on our website:

If you need to find some Creative Commons images to use in your teaching material, blog, publication or website, then hopefully these guides will be useful!

Image Courtesy of Pixabay


New Public Domain Images available for download

The Barnes Foundation has made available 1500 public domain images from it’s collection for free download.  The images are in the public domain meaning that they can be used for other purposes without having to seek permission.  Works include paintings by impressionist, post-impressionist, and early modern masters like Giorgio de Chirico, Henri Rousseau, Vincent Van Gogh, and Auguste Renoir.

The images are all gorgeous so I indulged myself and picked a few of my favourites to share with you.  I really like Renoir as an artist – his use of colours is so fantastic.  There were so many different Renoir paintings to choose from but I finally settled on this particular one – The Artist’s Family because the children were so adorable.

The collection also includes photographs of furniture and sculptures and other items in the collection such as this box by an identified maker made out of walnut with tulips on it.

Not all the images available on the website are in the public domain but there is also information about licensing these images if you would like to use them.

Details of the Barnes Foundation copyright and open access policy is available on their website.

You can browse the collection at https://www.barnesfoundation.org .  Leave us comment below and let us know which is your favourite image.

Finally I couldn’t resist include this painting by an unknown artist of Flower Piece in Glass Vase

Image at top of page – Sign for a Locksmith  All images courtesy of the Barnes Foundation, Merion and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


4 from 23 – Copyright Topics in 23 Research Things

23 Research Things is an online learning programme for university staff and graduate students, showcasing a range of digital tools that can support research activity.  While lots of research topics are covered, we thought it would be worth highlighting 4 copyright related things that you might find helpful:

Thing 17: Open Access – Gold, Green and Black – Open Access (OA) refers to the ability for anyone, anywhere, to access academic research free of charge. This blog post aims to demystify the three main varieties of OA: Gold, Green and Black.

Thing 18: Sharing Your Work (Without Breaking the Law) – Knowing what your publisher will let you share with others, and where you can share it, is one of the more challenging obstacles to reaching an audience outside academia. In this post, we provide some guidelines on sharing online (without upsetting your publisher).

Thing 19: Open Access and Your Thesis – Making your thesis publicly accessible requires consideration of a number of concepts: institutional policy; attitudes of prospective publishers; 3rd-party copyright; and indexing in search engines, including the effect on citation and impact of your work. This installment of 23 Research Things aims to shed some light on these considerations.  

Thing 20: Avoiding Deceptive, Unethical, Predatory and Vanity Publishing – Some argue that the breakdown of trusted information sources is one of the major challenges faced in the 21st century (Gray, 2017). This view is influenced by the growth in deceptive, unethical and predatory publishing practices occurring online. As victims, academics and their institutions, often experience financial and reputational damage from unethical scholarly publishing.

 

Image from Pixabay by 3dman_eu

 


Cooking for Copyright – Grow your own chicks

All this week, To celebrate the success of the original Cooking for Copyright campaign, which was instrumental in getting an amendment to the Copyright Act which brings the duration of unpublished works into line with published material, we are republishing our blogs from 2015.  We hope you enjoy them again.  We’ll be blogging more details of the recent amendments to the Copyright Act soon.

For today, our final day of cooking for copyright, we thought we share a recipe we found for the animal members of the family as well as a recipe for growing your own chicks!  I know it’s probably not technically within the scope of Cooking for Copyright but apart from being rather fun; I thought they were worth including because one of the frustrating things of not being able to share unpublished material due to copyright restrictions is that nobody really knows what hidden gems are lurking in our library collections and what their value could be.  It’s only when we share our collections with library users and the general public that we get people coming forward to help identify the significance and/or importance of material.

So here below from the Harrison family recipe book we have a recipe for Horse & Cattle Spice.  Presumably a nice treat for the equine and bovine members of the Harrison family!

Harrison Family – Horse & Cattle Spice

We had to include this because it was just too cute – a recipe for growing your own baby chickens.  Unfortunately, we weren’t able to find any fertilised eggs to test out this recipe to see if it actually works.  We would love to hear from anyone @ Vet Sci if these recipes actually work!

Harrison Family – Instructions for Working Incubator (aka How to grow your own chicks)

You still have until the end of the day to post your #cookingforcopyright photos on social media.  We hope you’ve enjoy this fun look at copyright.  Thank you to Katie Wood and all the other staff at Archives who helped find these fabulous recipes.  We couldn’t have done Cooking for Copyright without you!

Stay tuned to our blog as next week we’ll catch up on what’s been happening in the wider world of copyright because there’s been some interesting developments.

Download the recipe – Harrison Family – Horse & Cattle Spice

Download the recipe – Harrison Family – Instructions for Working Incubator (aka How to grow your own chicks)

Recipes and images courtesy of Harrison Family Collection Harrison Family 1978.0119, File 4_7 Recipe Book, Unit 2 University of Melbourne Archives.


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