LMS and Readings Online unavailable Friday 14th December 2018

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The Learning Management System (LMS) and Readings Online will be unavailable during the scheduled LMS maintenance window on Friday 14th December 2018 7.00am – 5.00pm. We apologise for the inconvenience this may cause.

We are encouraging staff and students to download any material required from Readings Online before the shutdown.  Staff and students will still be able to access digital content such as ebooks and journal articles via the Library catalogue and Discovery.  Simple instructions on how to do this are available from:

How to Access eBooks when Readings Online is Unavailable

How to Access Journal Articles when Readings Online is Unavailable

Please note this will only apply where Readings Online links to an ebook or a journal article that is available electronically via the Library’s databases.  If Readings Online links to a pdf of a print book chapter or journal article, access to the pdf will not be available and the pdf will need to be downloaded before LMS shutdown period.

The self-service function that allows staff to upload their subject readings to Readings Online will also be unavailable during the shutdown.

For more information visit Scheduled LMS maintenance: Friday 14 December 2018

If you have any questions about this or need assistance please contact us at readings-online@unimelb.edu.au

Image credit – Detour by Nicolas Nova  88x31


Minerva Access: Home to the University’s Thesis Collection, From 1893 to Today

Reposted from the Researcher@Library Blog, courtesy of Jenny McKnight.

Did you know the university’s institutional repository, Minerva Access, houses over 12,000 theses authored by university alumni?  The collection contains a mix of older theses, dating back to 125 years ago, which have been digitised as part of a recent digitisation project, along with newer native digital submissions.

The very first thesis to be submitted at the university is An examination of Teutonic Law, completed in 1893 for fulfilment of the Doctor of Laws by Dr E. Mayhew Brissenden.

Later in 1948, the university’s (and Australia’s) first two PhD theses were awarded: A French-Australian writer: Paul Wenz, by Dr Erica Wolff in the Faculty of Arts, and The preparation and properties of tantalum and some of its alloys by Dr Rupert Horace Myers in Science.

Moving forward in time to 2018, thesis deposit into Minerva Access is now compulsory and in digital format. The most recent submission to Minerva Access at the time of writing is Whole pattern analysis of serial protein X-ray crystallography diffraction data by Dr Sophie R Williams from the School of Physics. You can also access the University’s most popular theses here, with the ‘Top 20’ most downloaded theses exploring topics including early Internet culture, tipping practices, mining technologies, nursing and professional identity, PE teaching, Australian theatre, and Indigenous histories.

Interested in learning more…?

If you are a current PhD, Doctorate or Masters by Research candidate (or supervisor) please join us for the following sessions to learn more about depositing your thesis in Minerva Access:

Public Access and Your Thesis
Thursday 25th October, 10-11am, Baillieu Library

This session provides an overview of university policy and systems relevant to all students required to deposit their thesis in Minerva Access. It also includes a discussion of relevant university systems, the pros and cons of making your thesis open access, choosing an embargo period, and an overview of how to manage third party copyright materials in your thesis. Bookings essential. Please book online here.

 

Image – Pixabay.com


Open Access Week Event – Paywall: The Business of Scholarship Oct 26

A quick promotion for our upcoming Open Access Week event: a screening of the new documentary film, Paywall: The Business of Scholarship, followed by a panel discussion about the film and the future of academic publishing.

A little bit about the film:

  • Featuring interviews with representatives from The Royal Society, Springer Nature, The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Wikipedia, Creative Commons, Sci-Hub and researchers from around the world, Paywall: The Business of Scholarship questions the rationale behind the $25.2 billion a year for-profit academic publishing industry and demonstrates a clear need for increased access to research and knowledge. You can learn more about the film here if you’re interested.

The panel (confirmed so far) includes…

  • Professor Ginny Barbour, Director of the Australasian Open Access Strategy Group (AOASG)
  • Associate Professor Fiona Fidler, ARC Future Fellow, Ambassador for the Centre for Open Science (COS), and University of Melbourne researcher working in the areas of reproducibility, transparency and open science
  • Sarah Blatchford, Regional Director, Routledge/Taylor and Francis, and member of Board of Directors, Council for Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences (CHASS)

The important details:

 


How the Recent Copyright Amendments are Helping Us

The Potter Museum of Art recently opened a new exhibition – State of the Union which “explores the relationship of artists to political engagement through a focus on the labour movement and trade unions.” This exhibition is of particular interest to us copyright wise because curator, Jacqueline Doughty, was able to take advantage of the new copyright amendments for libraries, archives, galleries and museums to include documents as part of the exhibition.

The recent copyright amendments which came into effect in December 2017 included new provisions for Libraries and Archives (which also applies to galleries and museums.  One of these provisions relates to the administration of the collection.  Library or museum staff are permitted to make use of copyright material for administrative purposes directly related to the care or control of the collection.  This includes using material as part of an exhibition, making copies of material to be displayed in the exhibition because it the original is too fragile or valuable to be displayed and could be damaged if included in the Exhibition.

Jacqui’s query to us was:

“The Ian Potter Museum of Art will launch an exhibition in late July called State of the Union, which looks at the relationship between artists and trade unions.

Primarily an exhibition of artworks and union material such as banners and posters, there will also be a reading room that includes books and documents for visitors to leaf through.

We cannot use the originals of this reading material, because it will be damaged by handling – we receive up to 4,000 visitors per exhibition – so I am hoping it is permissible in an educational context to make facsimiles for archival purposes, of both the books, and a number of documents I will be borrowing from University of Melbourne archives. The documents are letters, minutes, newsletters from two archive collections – the Victorian Trades Hall archive and the Operative Painters & Decorators Union archive.

Could you advise me on whether it is permissible to copy this items so that our audience can read through them within the gallery?”

Getting permission from the many different copyright owners to make copies for display purposes would have been a time consuming and difficult task.  It would have significantly delayed the running of the exhibition.  In many cases, it may not have been possible to get permission for some documents which may have meant that they couldn’t be included in the Exhibition.  Luckily for Jacqui, the new administration of the collection provision applied meaning that she didn’t have to seek permission to reproduce any of the documents.

This is a great example of how the new provisions are making easier for people to use copyright material and be copyright compliant.

The State of the Union exhibition runs from Tuesday 24 Jul 2018 to Sunday 28 Oct 2018 at the Potter Museum of Art, for more information see http://www.art-museum.unimelb.edu.au/exhibitions/exhib-date/2018-07-24/exhib/state-of-the-union

Image – Ian Potter by Paul Ebbage Licenced under CC BY-NC.


Readings Online Available Again

Readings Online has been successfully upgraded and is available again for staff and students to access subject readings.

New features have been added that will make uploading subject readings and managing reading lists easier.   To learn more about these new feature visit the website, consult the updated Readings Online User Guide or register to attend an information session.

It is now easier for staff to roll-over, or reactivate, their reading list for a new teaching period as readings do not have to be rolled over individually.  Information on how to copy and create a new reading list for a teaching period is available in the Readings Online User Guide .

Semester 2 subjects that are not already using Readings Online are encouraged to upload their readings now to be ready for the start of semester.  All subjects must be copyright compliant and using Readings Online is the only way to ensure that a subject fulfils all copyright requirements.

If you are having difficulties accessing Readings Online, please restart your browser and clear your cache in the first instance.  If you continue to experience difficulties after taking these steps, please contact us.


Save the Internet – Tell the European Parliament to stop the harmful copyright proposal

I saw this this morning from Creative Commons – not really the best way to tackle piracy and promote innovation.

Tell the European Parliament to stop the harmful copyright proposal

European lawmakers are drafting new copyright rules that will require online platforms to automatically monitor and filter all user-uploaded content. Their intention is to stop copyright infringement, but the reality will go so far beyond that it will risk breaking the internet.

This means that nearly every platform — from Instagram to YouTube to SoundCloud to Flickr — will have to review every single uploaded file for copyright infringements before it is allowed to go online. Such a system would be so expensive that only huge companies would be able to join the market, and it would surely flag tons of perfectly harmless and non-infringing content.

The draft law would also allow press publishers to demand fees for linking to headlines and snippets. This will kill news linking on the web. How do we know? It already failed in Spain and Germany. The new “link tax” would drastically disrupt the free flow of information online.

These copyright proposals will break the internet as we know it.  Go to https://saveyourinternet.eu to find out more and what you can do to prevent this.

Source: Creative Commons CC BY.

Photo by David Iliff on Wikimedia Commons. CC BY-SA 3.0


Preparing Subject Readings Lists for Semester 2

Semester 2 subjects that are not yet using Readings Online should upload their readings using the self-service option in Readings Online.  Readings Online supports all formats of readings materials – both print and electronic.  Staff can upload:

  • Journal articles, conferences papers etc.
  • Book chapters and links to whole ebooks
  • Sheet music and dramatic works, such as plays and film and telescripts
  • Images
  • Sound recordings and films

Readings Online manages copyright compliance and should be used to provide copies of subject readings, such as journals articles and book chapters, to students via the LMS. All subjects must be copyright compliant and using Readings Online is the only way to ensure that a subject fulfils all copyright requirements.

Some copyright restrictions apply and readings will need to be checked by Readings Online staff for copyright compliance.  Staff should upload their readings as soon as possible before the start of semester to ensure that all readings are available in time for the start of the teaching period.  Information on how to upload readings is available in the Readings Online User Manual.  Staff can also attend a Readings Online information session to learn how to use Readings Online.  Sessions are scheduled throughout June and July.  Register here.

Subjects that used Readings Online in Semester 2 2017 will need to review and roll-over their readings to reactivate them and make them available for students.  When readings are rolled over, most readings will be reactivated immediately. However, some readings containing PDF files may need a further copyright check. As such, teaching staff should aim to roll over readings as soon as possible before the start of semester to ensure that all readings are available in time for the start of the teaching period.  Information on how to rollover your subject is available in the Readings Online User Manual.

Please note that Readings Online will be unavailable Wednesday 4 July 2018 as the system is being upgraded.  During this period, staff will not be able to access Readings Online to view, create or modify their readings lists.  Students will also not be able to view or download their readings. As part of the upgrade, new features will be available to make uploading subject readings and managing reading lists easier.  Further information about the upgrade and new features is available on the Readings Online website.

Image from Pixabay


Readings Online Unavailable for Upgrade 4 July 2018

Update

Readings Online has been successfully upgraded and is available again for staff and students to access subject readings.

If you are having difficulties accessing Readings Online, please restart your browser and clear your cache
in the first instance.  If you continue to experience difficulties after taking these steps, please contact us.

 

Readings Online will be unavailable Wednesday 4 July 2018.  During this period, staff will not be able to access Readings Online to view, create or modify their readings lists.  Students will also not be able to view or download their readings. As part of the upgrade, new features will be available to make uploading subject readings and managing reading lists easier.  New features include:

  • A simpler process for reusing items in your reading list for a new teaching period.
  • Multiple reading lists  – have different lists for different teaching periods, e.g. Semester 1/Intensive.
  • Apply a teaching period or custom dates to the whole reading list, rather than entering for each reading.
  • Add music, sound recordings, films and images to your reading list (copyright permitting).
  • Improved features for managing readings lists including the ability to hide readings from students.
  • Student view – preview what your students will see.
  • Removal of the unit library (we will migrate these resources for you).

To find out more about the new features visit, New features in Readings Online.  Alternatively, you can attend an information session during June and July. View session details and register.

We have tried to select a day and time for the upgrade that will have minimal disruption for staff and students.  If you need access to Readings Online during this time, please contact us to discuss alternative arrangements.  Other modules and content areas of the Learning Management System will not be affected by this system upgrade.

Full details of the upgrade are available on the Readings Online website.

 

Image from Pixabay

 


Changes to the Copyright Act – Information for Staff

In 2017, amendments were made to the Copyright Act. The amendments covered four key areas:

  • The statutory licences for educational purposes – which we rely on to make copyright material available to students, for example via Readings Online.
  • Providing material in accessible formats to staff and students with disabilities.
  • The preservation of material held in Library, Archives and Cultural collections.
  • The duration of copyright in unpublished works.

The amendments simplify existing provisions, making it easier for staff to comply with copyright requirements when using copyright material for these purposes.

Staff are encouraged to attend an information session in April to find out more about the amendments and how it will affect them.

Image credits (clockwise from top left DariuszSankowskiJag kan känna dina tankar by Stefan Malmesjö  Licenced under CC BY, Gellinger, Cocoparisienne All images licenced under CCO, unless indicated.


LMS and Readings Online unavailable Monday 18th December

7438056416_2c16bf4e74_z

The Learning Management System (LMS) and Readings Online will be unavailable during the scheduled LMS maintenance window on Monday 18th December 6.00am – 5.00pm. We apologise for the inconvenience this may cause.

We are encouraging staff and students to download any material required from Readings Online before the shutdown.  Staff and students will still be able to access digital content such as ebooks and journal articles via the Library catalogue and Discovery.  Simple instructions on how to do this are available from:

How to Access eBooks when Readings Online is Unavailable

How to Access Journal Articles when Readings Online is Unavailable

Please note this will only apply where Readings Online links to an ebook or a journal article that is available electronically via the Library’s databases.  If Readings Online links to a pdf of a print book chapter or journal article, access to the pdf will not be available and the pdf will need to be downloaded before LMS shutdown period.

The self-service function that allows staff to upload their subject readings to Readings Online will also be unavailable during the shutdown.

If you have any questions about this or need assistance please contact us at readings-online@unimelb.edu.au

Image credit – Detour by Nicolas Nova  88x31


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