‘The recent extreme weather – A scientific perspective’, Tue 1 March 2011

Presented by the Monash Sustainability Institute, the Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute, and the Melbourne Centre of the Australian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society.

From monster cyclones in Queensland to floods in Victoria, bushfires in Perth, heat waves in Russia, snow storms in Europe… in the last year the world in general, and Australia in particular, seem to have experienced a large number of extreme weather events. Were these events due to normal climate fluctuations or to climate change? – And does this question even make sense? Please join us to hear from prominent climate scientists about how unusual these events were and what the science knows – and doesn’t know – about what caused them.

Date: Tuesday, 1 March 2011

Time: 6:00–7:30 pm

Venue: Village Roadshow Theatrette, State Library of Victoria (Entry 3, 179 La Trobe Street, Melbourne)

Program
How extreme is the recent extreme weather?
Dr Karl Braganza, Manager of Climate Monitoring at the National Climate Centre of the Bureau of Meteorology

La Niña, cyclones, mozzies, and myxo
Professor Neville Nicholls, ARC Professorial Fellow in the School of Geography and Environmental Science at Monash University, and President of the Australian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society

Extreme weather and climate change
Professor David Karoly, ARC Federation Fellow and Professor of Meteorology in the School of Earth Sciences at the University of Melbourne

All welcome and no bookings required.

For further information, contact: msi-seminars “at” monash.edu

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One Response to ‘The recent extreme weather – A scientific perspective’, Tue 1 March 2011

  1. Mira Cherpak says:

    Weather is driven by air pressure (temperature and moisture) differences between one place and another. These pressure and temperature differences can occur due to the sun angle at any particular spot, which varies by latitude from the tropics. The strong temperature contrast between polar and tropical air gives rise to the jet stream. Weather systems in the mid-latitudes, such as extratropical cyclones, are caused by instabilities of the jet stream flow. ..

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