• AJ Barty
  1. Genes for everybody

    The “-omics” field is exploding. Technology in proteomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics and interactomics is becoming increasingly more efficient and accurate. The implications are profound, particularly in medicine, …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/sciencecommunication/2012/11/02/genes-for-everybody

  2. Developing Science

    Investing in science is critically important to a country’s development. Without the new scientists however, there will be no new science. Just as much investment in …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/sciencecommunication/2012/11/02/developing-science

  3. Power to the people

    A new IVF technique that reduces the risk of mitochondrial diseases, which affect over 100,000 Australians, has been developed by researchers of the Oregon Health and …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/sciencecommunication/2012/10/28/power-to-the-people

  4. Lovin’ science lovin’

    At 5:30pm on Friday with some wine, we will be marking the opening of the Art as Science group project exhibition at the Melbourne Graduate School …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/sciencecommunication/2012/10/18/lovin-science-lovin

  5. Nuts, right?

    Apparently if you are a psychopath, you can’t smell as well as the rest of us. That’s right, if you can’t distinguish the difference between the …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/sciencecommunication/2012/09/26/nuts-right

Number of posts found: 6