Research Profiles 2014

Thank you to the speakers and attendees of the 2014 Research Profiles Conference at the University of Melbourne.

I have added presentations to the agenda below
Sponsored by Symplectic/Digital Science
Twitter: #ResearchProfiles2014
Theme: As with last year’s program, we continue to investigate how best to take a strategic approach to publicly profiling research; maximising Australia and New Zealand’s opportunity to communicate and collaborate on research in an international arena.
Unlike many regions of the world, Australian and New Zealand universities have long had the capability to comprehensively report on their research, both at an aggregate and individual researcher level.
Whilst much of this capability has been driven by government reporting, many of our universities have leveraged their mastery of their research information to create both public and internal research portals, dramatically increasing the number of people that are able to access information about a University’s activities. This one-day conference will explore how Australasian universities as a whole can leverage this capability to gain advantage on an international stage.

Topics covered will include:

* The international state of play in research profiling
* An assessment of the technologies and standards that assist in the syndication of research information, with a particular emphasis on VIVO as an enabling platform
* Local and International experiences of implementing research profiling systems

Who should attend?

Creating and implementing a University-wide research profiling strategy requires collaboration across university boundaries. The 2013 Research Profiles program aims to stimulate discussion around a vision that should appeal to research managers and decision makers, research technologists, those in media and public relations, and the library.

Agenda.
(some speakers may change)

9.15 Introduction

9.30  Reflections on the direction of Research Metrics and Profiling.

Daniel Hook
Director, Research Metrics
Digital Science

Presentation

10.00 Fostering Collaboration between scientists, the Virtual Home progaram at UCSF

Leslie Yuan
Director, Virtual Home
Clinical & Translational Science Institute
UCSF School of Medicine

Presentation

10.30 On the reproducibility of science: unique identification of research resources in the biomedical literature.

Melissa Haendel
Lead Ontologist
Assistant Professor
OHSU Library
Department of Medical Informatics & Clinical Epidemiology
Presentation Via Skype

http://dx.doi.org/10.7717/peerj.148 

11 – 11.30 Break

11.30 Building Capability Maps: Looking at the role of research data in building ‘research opportunity workflows.’

Simon Porter
Research Knowledge Systems Advisor
The University of Melbourne

Presentation

12 The VIVO Story: Origins, and Future Directions

Dr Mike Conlon
Co Director, Clinical and Translational Science Institute
University of Florida

Presentation

12.45

The Next Steps with the Griffith Research Hub
A roadmap of future development activities will be outlined including citation metrics & altmetics, automated information extraction and harvesting data from external data sources.”

Jan Hettenhausen
Senior Web and Application Developer, Griffith University

Presentation

1.15 – 2 Lunch
2.00 Getting Started. Fresh experiences in making the case for university research profiling.

Ben Cornwell
Manager, Information Services for Research
Research and Innovation Division
University of Wollongong

Presentation

2.30 Discussion and Reflection

 

Research Profiles Conference 2013

Building on the success of the VIVO community day last year, we are pleased to announce a Research Profiles Conference 2013 the University of Melbourne.

Details below:

Research Profiles Conference 2013
University of Melbourne
February 18th 2013
Venue: Melbourne University
Sponsored by Symplectic

Registrations: http://researchprofiles2013.eventbrite.com

Theme: Taking a strategic approach to publicly profiling research; maximizing Australia and New Zealand’s opportunity to communicate and collaborate on research in an international arena.

Unlike many regions of the world, Australian and New Zealand universities have long had the capability to comprehensively report on their research, both at an aggregate and individual researcher level. Whilst much of this capability has been driven by government reporting, many of our universities have leveraged their mastery of their research information to create both public and internal research portals, dramatically increasing the number of people that are able to access information about a University’s activities. This one day conference will explore how Australasian Universities as a whole can leverage this capability to gain advantage on an international stage.

Topics covered will include:

  • The international state of play in research profiling
  • An assessment of the technologies and standards that assist in the syndication of research information, with a particular emphasis on VIVO as an enabling platform
  • Local experiences of implementing research profiling systems
  • A road map for open research data and the university
  • The future of research reporting and assessment in an era of open data

Who should attend?

Creating and implementing a University wide research profiling strategy requires collaboration across university boundaries. The 2013 research profiles program aims to stimulate discussion around a vision that should appeal to Research Managers and Decision Makers, Research Technologists, those in media and public relations, and the library .

Tentative Agenda:

9.15 Introduction:

9.30 Daniel Hook: CEO Symplectic (Summary of international standards, and developments in research profiling )

10.00  Michael Gallagher Executive Director  Go8 : the Australian Knowledge Gateway

10.30 Paul Jensen Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research: The ASTRA project: STAR Metrics in Australia

11.00 – 11.30 break

11.30 Jack Rejtman General Manager The Conversation : The evolving role of the public researcher

12 VIVO invited Guest Alex Viggio: An overview of VIVO

12.30 VIVO at the University of Melbourne: The elevation of Research Information as a strategic public asset: Simon Porter

1-2 break for lunch

2 VIVO at Griffith

2.30 UWA VIVO and research data: Toby Burrows

3.00: Proposed Panel: open research data and the University – What should be the road map?

3.30 – 345 break

3.45 – 530 Implementing VIVO and the VIVO Development Agenda. Jim Blake, Alex Viggio, Simon Porter and others

Source Code (rdf2OAI)

A key component of  the research data data registry is the ability to harvest records upto research data registry. source code for this particular component of the registry can be found at: http://code.google.com/p/ands-vitro-code/downloads/list

documentation for this component can be found in a directory of the source code here:

With thanks to VeRSI for developing this component of the project.

Source Code (Core Repository)

As part of the VIVO implementation for the Central Research Data
Registry at the University of Melbourne, we have put together a
codebase that is based on VIVO 1.4 with modifications and additions to
the form generators and Freemarker templates.

The documentation is available at:

https://github.com/UniMelb-source/vivo/raw/vivo-crdr/Developer%20Documentation.pdf

and the codebase itself at:

https://github.com/UniMelb-source/vivo/tree/vivo-crdr

An Integration template for a research data registry

As noted in the post on using deductive workflows, an advantage of a metadata store that is connected to the university’s key research administration data is that deductive workflows can be employed to reduce the amount of data entry required. These concepts are also explained in the following poster that was presented in the third international VIVO conference.

As part of the research data connector solution deployed at the University of Melbourne, add and delete deltas of the Find an Expert public model are exposed to the triple store. (a methodology for creating VIVO data from administrative datasets was previously described here)

A key challenge challenge with this solution is that the research data connector only communicates information about current staff and their associated outputs, and yet the registry is required to keep information on individuals permanently. To solve this problem, a solution has been devised to copy objects such as people, publications, and grants into the core registry once they are no longer part of the research data connector feed. This allows for the connector to be the source of truth for core information elements for the time that they are part of the current research information ‘bubble.’ Once information falls outside of the bubble it is the responsibility of registry to maintain it.

On a technical level, the following process has been designed:

  • ADD refers to a temporary in-memory model based on the provided ADD delta file

  • DEL refers to a temporary in-memory model based on the provided DEL delta file

  • FAE refers to a in-database model which is visible from VIVO, but is read-only from the web interface

  • RDR refers to the default in-database model used by VIVO, hence read-write from the web interface

  • TYPES refers to the temporary in-memory sub-model created from {?s <rdf:type> ?o} in FAE

Step 1:

  • Add ADD and Delete (temporary) models to the Research Data Registry

Step 2:

  • For each assertion (S, P, O) in RDR:

    • If

      • O is not referred to in ADD &

      • O is referred to in DEL &

      • Assertion O <rfd:type> T exists in DEL &

      • Assertion O <rdf:type> T’ (where T’ != T) does not exist in TYPES

        • consider this a deletion, determine children and add this into RDR

    • Else

      • consider this an edit of a property/subproperty and continue

Step 3:

  • Delete DEL from FAE

Points to note:

  • Consultation of both ADD and DEL is required to determine whether an assertion can be considered part of a straight deletion or modification

  • The assumption has been made that a ADD/DEL delta file pair is created atomically, that is, if an object is being removed from FAE, all its relevant children are removed in the same action

  • We are considering all the children of a referred object; if total archive / replication isn’t required or performance is not acceptable, we can whitelist a set of predicates that need to be kept for a given object type

University research profile policy as an enabler for research metadata store projects

Whilst consent to publish research data sets up to portals such as Research Data Australia is provided on a case by case basis by researchers, there is an assumed consent granted to describe the entities around the research dataset, including both agreements and researcher details. Without prior policy, securing permission to publish details about these related entities could prove cumbersome. At the University of Melbourne ,  our research profiles policy addresses this issue by making it clear that all researchers have a public identity unless there is a clear and exception reason for them not to.

A copy of the Find an expert policy in word format can be found here: Find an Expert Policy

VIVO mapping document

I have been meaning to upload for a while our VIVO mapping document that we used to develop our feed to VIVO.

For public consumption, I have removed our table definitions, however I think it should provide a useful template.

With huge thanks to Anna Morely for comming up with such a clear requirements format.

VIVO Mapping_Document-public

VIVO ANDS Ontology

The new ANDS VIVO ontology can be found here:

http://purl.org/ands/ontologies/vivo/

VIVO Community day – thankyou

Thankyou to everybody who participated in the VIVO Community day.

Feedback from the day has been that everybody found it useful to be exposed to the broader VIVO movement vision. It was great to get perspectives from multiple institutions on VIVO implementation challenges – a highlight being a demonstration of Griffith University’s VIVO research hub.

A second highlight was the willingness in the Australian community to collaborate on improvements to using VIVO as a metadata store and a recognition of the strategic alignment between these efforts and work both in New Zealand, and Cornell University (DataStaR.)  A write up on the collaborative development workshop in the afternoon should follow shortly.

A special thank you to Brian, Huda, and Stephen for making the trip out to Australia and sharing their perspectives, and to Symplectic and ANDS for making it possible.

As promised, the slides from the morning’s presentation are now available:

VIVO Community Day Main Presentation

DataStaR Community Day Presentation

VIVO Community Day 6th February 2012

On 6 February 2012, the University of Melbourne will be hosting a VIVO Community Day, sponsored by Symplectic and the Australian National Data Service.

The community day will be an opportunity to get an overview of VIVO developments, as well as enagage with senior VIVO developers from Cornell University and Florida University. Cost is free.

Registrations for this even can be made at : http://vivocommunityday.eventbrite.com/

Draft Agenda

Location: Level 1 Alan Gilbert Building, (corner of Barry and Grattan Streets)

Morning

Welcome

Towards building an international Network of Researchers, the VIVO vision

VIVO the Application

VIVO the Ontology

VIVO Development Road Map

VIVO Collaboration Initiatives

Eagle I, an Ontology for Research Infrastructure

  • EuroCRIS
  • Harvard Catalyst Profiles
  • ORCID

Getting the most out of VIVO – bells whistles, and internal integration

  • VIVO Visualizations
  • VIVO website plugins
  • VIVO mini grant report

Morning Tea

Round table reports: Sharing Our VIVO implementation Experiences

Getting data into VIVO: approaches
Using the VIVO Harvester/Symplectic Connectors
Selling/Promoting VIVO: Staff Profiling/ Data Management

Lunch

Using VIVO as a metadata Store
dataStaR
VIVO ANDS collaboration Agenda
VIVO at Griffith
Data Capture Integration techniques: QUT/Griffith/VeRSI

Afternoon Tea

Workshop: Working together: a collaborative development agenda for VIVO metadata store development

Workshop 2: Hands-on with VIVO

Workshop 3: Research Admin Systems and VIVO