Events

THURSDAY, 10 FEBRUARY


Dorcas McClean

Presentation

10:30 AM, Kenneth Myer Auditorium TICKETS

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There are many extraordinary aspects to Dorcas McClean’s career. Not only did she win prizes and scholarships, embark on a European career as a violin virtuoso and appear as a concerto soloist with conductors of the likes of Ormandy and Schnéevoigt, she did so in the shadow of her equally talented elder brother and as a woman in an era when only the most exceptional women occupied the public stage. This talk explores her intriguing family history and the circumstances of her origins in Sydney in the 1920s, both of which shaped the features of the career that followed. 
Presenter: Dr Suzanne Robinson



The Violin in Australia

Presentation

11:15 AM, Kenneth Myer Auditorium TICKETS

In this session, I will outline a history of violin playing in Australia from Federation to the years post World War II. What shaped the musical culture and who were the drivers of educational opportunity for young violinists down under during this turbulent time? While teachers like Flesch and Auer were transforming the education of violinists in Europe and the US, what forces, aesthetic visions or schools of playing developed violin performance in Australia?
Presenter: Dr Goetz Richter AM



The Artistry of Alma Moodie

Presentation

1:15 PM, Kenneth Myer Auditorium TICKETS

In the photo: Alma Moodie, Frankfurt, n.d. (late 1930s, early 1940s). Courtesy Kay Dreyfus

“…Probably the finest artist in any branch who has ever left these shores…”

Distinguished Australian Scholar Dr Kay Dreyfus has worked on Alma Moodie for over three decades. Her Distinguished Australian Scholar Dr. Kay Dreyfus has worked on Alma Moodie for over three decades. Her biography of the violinist (Bluebeard’s Bride, Lyrebird Press, 2013) was recently complemented by a publication of Moodie’s letters (The Fractured Self, Peter Lang, 2021 – with Diana K. Weekes). The letters reveal Moodie as a charismatic artist deeply embedded in German musical life of the Weimar- and post Weimar times. They open a vista of complexity which will be intriguing violinists, researchers and historians for years to come. In this session, Dr. Dreyfus introduces Moodie and her work and discusses in conversation with violinist Dr. Goetz Richter the diverse significance of this most important violinist of the Twentieth Century. The session also features short musical excerpts from Moodie’s repertoire performed by Goetz Richter with Sydney pianist Dr. Jeanell Carrigan AM.
Presenters: Dr Kay Dreyfus, Dr Goetz Richter AM, Jeanell Carrigan AM



Robert Davidovici

Masterclass

2:30 PM, Kenneth Myer Auditorium TICKETS

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Dorcas McClean Competition

Semi-Finals

4:00 PM – 8:00 PM, Hanson Dyer Hall TICKETS

4:00 PM Semi-Final Round One: Leanne McGowan (violin) and Louisa Breen (piano)
5:30 PM Semi-Final Round Two: Emily Su (Violin) and Laurence Matheson (piano)
7:00 PM Semi-Final Round Three: Mana Ohashi (violin) and Louisa Breen (piano)

FRIDAY, 11 FEBRUARY


Facing the Music Lyndall Hendrickson’s Way (1994)

Film Screening

10:00 AM, Kenneth Myer Auditorium TICKETS

Born in 1917, Lyndall Hendrickson’s life was one of extremities, from childhood violin prodigy to fame and wealth, to polio, paralysis and recovery. She has received worldwide acclaim for her innovative methods for teaching music, and achieved remarkable success both with very gifted children as well as those with severe autism. The film won accolades at the Golden Gate Awards and the Banff World Television Festival.

Written and Directed by Manuela Alberti; Producers Manuela Alberti/Andrew Wiseman

Lyndall Hendrickson

Presentation

11:15 AM, Kenneth Myer Auditorium TICKETS

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Australian violinist Lyndall Hendrickson AM (1917 – 2017) was a pioneer in developing multi-sensory methods in violin pedagogy. Whilst overcoming paralysis from polio myelitis, she drew in theories of human performance and formulated violin drills from her recovery program. Hendrickson’s reputation as a concert performer and pedagogue led to an invitation to lecture on her teaching methods at the Conservatories of Music in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou. The first woman and western violinist to do so post the Cultural Revolution. Her teaching files, papers, lectures, stories and teaching materials demonstrate connections from her research in the fields of neuroscience, educational psychology and multi-sensory learning approaches. 
Presenter: Ibby Mikajlo

Tossy Spivakovsky

Presentation

1:15 PM, Kenneth Myer Auditorium TICKETS

Born in Odessa on December 23, 1906, Nathan “Tossy” Spivakovsky was a member of a powerhouse family of musicians. Under threat from pogroms in the Russian Empire, the family relocated to Berlin. Tossy, along with his pianist brother Jascha and cellist Edmund Kurtz formed the highly acclaimed Spivakovsky-Kurtz Trio. Tipped by none other than Richard Strauss that they were in imminent danger following Hitler’s rise to power, the trio boarded a ship for Australia in 1933, where they taught at the Melbourne Conservatorium of Music and at Scotch College and concertised regularly throughout the country. Tossy left Australia for the USA in 1940 to become Concertmaster of The Cleveland Orchestra where he enjoyed an incredible career as soloist and teacher in North America and Europe. This presentation will trace the years Tossy spent in Australia and the indelible mark left by his family on Australian music.
Presenters: Dr Curt Thompson, Michael Spivakovsky

Dorcas McClean Competition

Semi-Finals

4:00 PM – 8:00 PM, Hanson Dyer Hall TICKETS

4:00 PM Semi-Final Round Four: David Carreon (violin) and Rhodri Clarke (piano)
5:30 PM Semi-Final Round Five: Jackie Wong (violin) and Rhodri Clarke (piano)
7:00 PM Semi-Final Round Six: Grace Wu (violin) and Laurence Matheson (piano)

FINALISTS ANNOUNCED


SATURDAY, 12 FEBRUARY


Robert Pikler

Presentation and Video Interviews

10:00 AM Session One, 11:15 AM Session Two
Kenneth Myer Auditorium TICKETS

This presentation will feature video interviews with five people closely associated with violinist, violist
conductor and pedagogue Robert Pikler. It will trace his time in Java, touching on his treatment as a Japanese prisoner of war, and will offer reflections on his superb artistry, his wizardry on a chess board and his inspiring teaching methodology.

Presenters: Robert Davidovici, Charmian Gadd OAM, William Hennessy AM, Cho-Liang Lin, Gregory Pikler, Dr Curt Thompson

Jan Sedivka

Presentation

1:15 PM, Kenneth Myer Auditorium TICKETS

This presentation will examine Jan Sedivka’s influence on teaching and playing in Australia, including a video interview with renowned pedagogue Elizabeth Morgan and contributions from other musicians who studied with him.

Presenters: Keith Crellin OAM with contributions from Elizabeth Morgan AM

Jan Sedivka

Panel Discussion

2:30 PM, Kenneth Myer Auditorium TICKETS

This discussion will feature a collection of former students and associates of Jan Sedivka.

Keynote Speakers: Keith Crellin OAM with Special Guests

Guest Artist Recital

Cho Liang Lin

7:00 PM, Hanson Dyer Hall TICKETS

With Robert Davidovici, Curt Thompson and Louisa Breen

SUNDAY, 13 FEBRUARY


Mozart’s Library

Presentation

10:00 AM, Kenneth Myer Auditorium TICKETS

Most accounts of Mozart’s development as a composer – and in particular of his acquaintance with the music of other composers of his time – rely on references in the family letters, copies of other composers’ works that we know he owned (and often copied), or the assumption that his early travels importantly brought him in contact with ‘modern’ composers such as Johann Christian Bach, or German expatriate composers in Paris, including Eckard, Honauer and Schobert. This is, in fact, a kind of teleological history that elevates modernism over the actual musical experience of eighteenth-century Europe where old works rubbed shoulders with new works and when patterns of dissemination were more important than after-the-fact histories to any composer’s acquaintance with others’ music. Mozart’s Music Library redress this historical imbalance by representing an account – and editions – of the music Mozart actually knew, based not only on the family letters but other documentary and musical sources as well, most of them little explored or dismissed as largely irrelevant. These include Leopold Mozart’s activities as the agent for the Nürnberg publisher Johann Ulrich Haffner, music that the Mozarts heard or acquired on their European travels, and several manuscripts that until recently were not recognized as deriving from the family library. These include not only works we might expect the Mozarts to have known – works by JC and CPE Bach, Haydn, Pleyel, Viotti and others – but also works and repertories we might never have supposed Mozart was acquainted with, including English organ concertos, late seventeenth- or early eighteenth-century French airs, early English Gothic ballads, and concertos by the Baroque composer Francesco Antonio Bonporti. Above all, Mozart’s Music Library shows that Mozart’s acquaintance with the musical world around him was pretty much like ours: diverse and broad ranging, including both older and newer music. And that, on the ground, music history is a ‘thick’ history, a reflection of the immediate, documentable experience of a composer.
Presenter: Professor Cliff Eisen

Mozart as Violinist

Presentation

11:15 AM, Kenneth Myer Auditorium TICKETS

As a violinist – or as a composer for violin – Mozart is best remembered for his early concertos composed between 1773-1775, the Concertone K190 and the Sinfonia Concertante K364. The fact that these works are all relatively early, and that he composed no complete violin concertos during his time in Vienna, has contributed to the perception that Mozart, about 1780, more or less gave up violin performance and soloistic violin composition, and that he shifted his focus almost exclusively to the piano. To be sure, the overwhelming quantity and quality of his keyboard works is powerful testament to this. But at the same time, his interest in the violin hardly languished. He not only continued to perform on the violin but the idea of a soloistic violin – an ersatz violin concerto style – continues to appear in his later Salzburg and Viennese works including the Divertimento K287 and the String Quintet K614. All told, the violin played a significant role in Mozart’s performing and compositional career, from his early violin performance as a child prodigy – on occasion with equal billing to his keyboard performances – to his employment as a violinist in the Salzburg court music and composition of the concertos, and later in Vienna, even among the last works he composed.
Presenter: Professor Cliff Eisen



Cho Liang Lin

Masterclass

1:15 PM, Kenneth Myer Auditorium TICKETS

Dorcas McClean Competition

Finals

3:00 PM, Hanson Dyer Hall TICKETS