Who’s Who

This page provides brief biographies of some of the women who supported International House from the early 1950s to the early 1970s. Biographies, photographs and other content will continue to be added. To suggest an entry, please contact the International House Archives.

Entries on this page were written by:

Names

Before the late 1970s, married women were regularly referred to by their husbands’ given names. For example, Dorothy Bolle married Arthur Dean and so was often referred to as ‘Mrs Arthur Dean’ or ‘Mrs A. Dean’. Here we have aimed to find out women’s birth names (both their given names and their family names).

Dates

Dates of birth and death have been checked where possible using:

Find entries by family name

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

B

Brookes, Ivy (1883–1970)

Alternative names: Ivy Deakin; Ivy Deakin Brookes; Mrs Herbert Brookes

Portrait of Ivy Brookes, n.d., Lafayette Studios. National Library of Australia, http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-137117175

Ivy Brookes (née Deakin) was born in Melbourne in 1883. She studied at the Conservatorium of Music and worked as a violinist before marrying the businessman Herbert Robinson Brookes in 1905 (“Our public women”, 1928). Ivy Brookes was a dedicated community worker, supporting women’s groups and the arts. For fifty years she was a member of the board of the Royal Women’s Hospital (Patrick, 1979/2006). In 1933, she established the International Club of Victoria, an organisation aimed at ‘the fostering of international understanding and peace’ (“International Club opened”, 1933). In 1957, the International Club presented a piano to International House as a Christmas gift (Robertson, 1957). When the Club’s building was sold in 1958, Ivy Brookes donated £5000 from the sale to the International House Appeal (“Women’s letters”, 1958). She was also a patron of the 1961 International House Building Appeal (Jackson, 1961).

References

The International Club opened (1933, April 13). Table Talk, 46. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article149546765

Jackson, M. (1961, June 19). International House Building Fund Women’s Committee: President’s report. International House Archives.

Our public women: Mrs Herbert Brookes (1928, May 12). The Australasian, 19. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article140810028

Patrick, A. (1979/2006). Brookes, Ivy (1883–1970). In Australian Dictionary of Biography. National Centre of Biography, Australian National University. https://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/brookes-ivy-5640/text9089

Robertson, M. M. E. (1957, December 20). [Letter to Mr Brian Jones, Warden, International House.] International House Archives.

Women’s letters (1958, April 30). The Bulletin, vol. 79, no. 4081, 54. https://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-68375465

C

Casey, Ethel Marian Sumner (Maie) (1891–1983)

Alternative names: Maie Ryan; Lady Casey

Written by Allegra McCormack

Black and white portrait of Lady Maie Casey with her arms folded
Portrait of Maie Casey, Washington, United States, c. 1941. National Library of Australia. http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-147916419

Maie Casey (née Ryan) was a patron of International House and worked frequently alongside the Women’s Auxiliaries. She was born in Brunswick to a well-connected Melbourne family and educated in England and Paris. Notably her father’s cousin was Lady Janet Clarke (Langmore, 2007), who would become the benefactor for Janet Clarke Hall. After the outbreak of World War 1, Maie Casey volunteered to work at a Hospital for Wounded Officers as well as the Australian Wounded and Missing Inquiry Bureau. She later returned to England where she married Richard Casey in 1924. Richard Casey was elected to the Australian House of Representatives as the member for Geelong in 1931, becoming Treasurer in 1935 and undertaking several diplomatic missions during the 1940s. Maie Casey was a formidable and driven supporter of her husband’s political career, dubbed ‘Lady Macbeth’ by Robert Menzies. After World War 2, Maie Casey began her work as a patroness and public speaker. In 1950 she was named inaugural patron of the Association of Women Pilots of Australia and in 1953 published Early Melbourne architecture, a collaborative work with her brother-in-law Dermot Casey. In 1960, Maie Casey began her involvement with International House. She served as ‘Patroness-in-Chief’ of the appeal for the Samuel Wadham Wing and designed the International House Christmas card for the same year (Jackson, 1961). Following her husband’s death in 1976, Maie Casey mostly withdrew from public life.

References

Jackson, M. (1961, June 19). International House Building Fund Women’s Committee: President’s report. International House Archives.

Langmore, D. (2007). Casey, Lady Ethel Marian (Maie) (1891–1983). In Australian Dictionary of Biography. National Centre of Biography, Australian National University. https://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/casey-lady-ethel-marian-maie-12296/text22081

Clunies Ross, Janet Leslie (1904–1986)

Alternative names: Janet Carter; Mrs I. Clunies Ross; Lady Clunies Ross

Written by Allegra McCormack

Janet Clunies Ross (née Carter), 1920. Image courtesy of MLC School Archives, Sydney.

Janet Clunies Ross was a prominent social welfare activist and vocal opponent of racial prejudice. Born Janet Leslie Carter, she was born in Marrickville, New South Wales and studied English at the University of Sydney. She graduated with first class honours in 1924 and began working at the University of Sydney in the Fisher Library. In 1927 she married Ian Clunies Ross. During the 1930s Janet Clunies Ross travelled with her husband to Tokyo (Schedvin, 1993/2006). The experience of living in Japan greatly informed her stance as a strong opponent of the treatment of Japanese people in Australia during World War 2. In 1946, following Ian Clunies Ross’ appointment to the Executive Committee of the CSIR (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation), Janet Clunies Ross moved to Melbourne where the couple became increasingly involved with patronage at the University of Melbourne. In 1953, Janet Clunies Ross worked as a vice-president for the International House Market Fair (“House fair”, 1952). Ian Clunies Ross was the first chair of the International House Council, and the family remained strong supporters of the college. Following her husband’s death in 1959, Janet Clunies Ross returned to university to study criminology and taught at the University of Melbourne Criminology Department for six years. In 1961, Janet Clunies Ross decided to donate royalties from the sale of the book Ian Clunies Ross: Memoirs and papers, with some fragments of autobiography to International House (Jackson, 1961).

References

House fair (1952, December 30). The Age, 5. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article205435331

Jackson, M. (1961, June 19). International House Building Fund Women’s Committee: President’s report. International House Archives.

MLC School, Sydney (2017). Lady Janet Clunies Ross (Carter, 1920). https://www.mlcsyd.nsw.edu.au/news-publications/eminent-alumnae/lady-janet-clunies-ross-carter-1920

Schedvin, C. B. (1993/2006). Clunies Ross, Sir William Ian (1899–1959). In Australian Dictionary of Biography. National Centre of Biography, Australian National University. https://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/clunies-ross-sir-william-ian-9770/text17265

D

Dean, Dorothy Muriel (1896–1987)

Alternative names: Dorothy Bolle; Mrs Arthur Dean; Lady Dean

Dorothy Dean (née Bolle) was born in South Yarra, Victoria in 1896. She worked as a kindergarten teacher before marrying the lawyer and later judge Arthur Dean in 1922 (Sharwood, 1993/2006; Strachan, 1954). She was active in the University of Melbourne community through the Town and Gown Guild and was president of the University Centenary Committee (“Canadians celebrate”, 1955). She was the first president of the International House Law Group and a patron of the 1961 Building Fund (Larkins, 2018, 13; Jackson, 1961). In 1984, the Law Group established a scholarship named after Lady Dean to recognise the Deans’ contributions to International House (International House Council, 1984).

References

Canadians celebrate their day (1955, July 2). The Argus, 10. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71665181

International House Council (1984, March 26). Minutes of meeting no. 1/84. International House Archives.

Jackson, M. (1961, June 19). International House Building Fund Women’s Committee: President’s report. International House Archives.

Sharwood, R. L. (1993/2006). Dean, Sir Arthur (1893–1970). In Australian Dictionary of Biography. National Centre of Biography, Australian National University. https://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/dean-sir-arthur-9933/text17593

Strachan, C. (1954, March 20). Wives of leading men: Mrs Arthur Dean. The Argus, 15. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article26597973

Duncan, Ada Constance (1896–1970)

Written by Allegra McCormack

Constance Duncan, c. 1922. International House Archives

Constance Duncan was a social activist who worked throughout her lifetime to promote international cooperation and peace. She was born in Canterbury, Melbourne and studied a Bachelor of Arts at the University of Melbourne. She completed her M.A. in 1922. As a young woman Constance Duncan worked as a travelling secretary for the Australian Student Christian Movement, primarily working in Japan.

After returning to Australia in 1932 Constance Duncan began her involvement in international affairs and the promotion of global peace across numerous organisations. In 1938 she was appointed Director of the Victorian International Refugee Emergency Council, an organisation that aimed to help dispel community prejudices against refugees and help them adapt to life in Australia. After World War 2, Constance Duncan was appointed as a welfare officer to the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration and helped organise the first United Nations appeal for children in 1948.

Constance Duncan’s involvement with International House began in the 1950s. Well-regarded for her promotion of global cooperation, in 1953 she was invited by Ian Clunies Ross to canvass for funds as part of the International House Appeal. Constance Duncan also served as a member of the International House Council from 1955 to 1966. In recognition of her work, in 1972 the private dining room at International House was named after her.

References

Humphreys, L. R., Of many nations: a history of International House the University of Melbourne, Melbourne University Publishing, 2004.

Langmore, D. (1996/2006). ‘Duncan, Ada Constance (1896–1970)’. In Australian Dictionary of Biography. National Centre of Biography, Australian National University. https://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/duncan-ada-constance-10061/text17747

G

Grimwade, Mabel Louise (1887–1973)

Alternative names: Mabel Kelly; Mab Grimwade; Lady Grimwade

Written by Allegra McCormack

Black and white photograph of Lady Mabel Grimwade seated in a garden with a small dog on her lap.
Mabel Grimwade with a pet dog in the garden of her Toorak home, Miegunyah, 1913. University of Melbourne Archives, 2002.0003.00190.

Mabel Grimwade was a prominent social figure and patron in Melbourne. In 1909 she married Wilfrid Russell Grimwade, a former Ormond College resident who studied science at the University of Melbourne. Russell Grimwade remained a significant supporter of the University of Melbourne culminating in the foundation of the building of the Russell Grimwade School of Biochemistry. Mabel Grimwade continued to support the School of Biochemistry after her husband’s death in 1950. She was also a patroness for a number of University programs including the University’s Centenary Appeal and the development of International House. In 1953, Mabel Grimwade led the committee for the International House Market Fair (“International House given large cheque”, 1953). Beyond the University of Melbourne she was active in a range of institutions, including the National Gallery Society of Victoria, the Australian Ballet and the Native Plants Preservation Society of Victoria (Flesch, 2017). Mabel Grimwade died in 1973. Upon her death she bequeathed what would become known as the Russell and Mab Grimwade Miegunyah Fund to the University of Melbourne.

References

Flesch, J. (2017). Grimwade, Mabel Louise (1887–1973). In The Australian Women’s Register. Australian Women’s Archives Program, The University of Melbourne. https://www.womenaustralia.info/biogs/AWE6066b.htm

International House given large cheque (1953, July 1). The Argus, 6. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article23253396

Poynter, J. R. (1983/2006). Grimwade, Sir Wilfrid Russell (1879–1955). In Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University. https://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/grimwade-sir-wilfrid-russell-7054/text11137

J

Jackson, Edna Mavis (1913–2000)

Alternative names: Mavis Swan; Mrs A. V. Jackson

Written by Allegra McCormack

Black and white photograph of a group of people on the pathway leading to the entrance of International House at the University of Melbourne
Mavis Jackson and other visitors arriving at International House for the opening of the Samuel Wadham Wing, 1963. UM 805/295, International House Archives

The first female chair of the International House Council, Mavis Jackson remained a dedicated and hardworking member of the International House community throughout her life. The daughter of a British naval officer, Mavis Swan was born in Masulapatam, India in 1913. She attended boarding school at the Methodist Ladies’ College in Kew, Victoria before studying a Bachelor of Science at the University of Melbourne. Mavis Swan graduated in 1935 and began her career as a microbiologist. During World War 2 she joined a Volunteer Aid Detachment where she met Alan Vaughan Jackson, an army pathologist. They were married in 1942.

In the early 1950s Mavis Jackson was recruited by Ian Clunies Ross to assist with fundraising efforts for International House. She was the first secretary of the International House Auxiliaries (“International House plans”, 1953) and went on to become the group’s president. She proved an indomitable force, described by Lyndal Pascoe as ‘someone who loved people and who drew them into her causes through the force of her personality and her genuine enthusiasm’ (quoted in Kilpatrick, 2000). Her work at International House was recognised in 1968 when she was appointed a Member of the Order of the British Empire ‘for her efforts as president of the women’s auxiliary of International House’ (“Philanthropist is made Dame”, 1968). In 1973 Mavis Jackson became chair of the International House Council, a position she held until 1979. In 1977 she was awarded the Queen’s Jubilee Medal in recognition of her community service (Kilpatrick, 2000).

References

International House plans (1953, July 16). The Argus, 4. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article23256179

Kilpatrick, J. (2000). Jackson, Mavis (1913–2000). In Obituaries Australia, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University. http://oa.anu.edu.au/obituary/jackson-mavis-27510/text34912

Obituaries (2000, November 16). The Age, 27. https://www.newspapers.com/newspage/120667433/

Philanthropist is made Dame (1968, January 1). The Age, 9.

M

McConnan, Gladys Anne

Alternative names: Gladys Hay; Lady McConnan

Gladys McConnan (née Hay) was a member of the committee for the 1953 International House Fair (“House fair”, 1952), organising a craft stall and sewing ‘apron bags’ to sell (“Their handwork”, 1953). She was also active in fundraising for the University of Melbourne through the Town and Gown Guild, becoming president of the group in 1954 (“Dressing for the Guineas”, 1954). She was married to the banker Leslie James McConnan.

References

Dressing for the Guineas (1954, October 6). The Herald (Melbourne), 31. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article243437349

House fair (1952, December 30). The Age, 5. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article205435331

Their handwork is individual (1953, April 10). The Age, 5. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article205723370

McDonald, Mary Cosser

Alternative names: Mary Trotter; Mrs J. G. B. McDonald; Lady McDonald

Mary McDonald (née Trotter) was a committee member for the 1953 International House Fair (“House fair”, 1952). She was married to John Gladstone Black (Jack) McDonald, the Premier of Victoria in the early 1950s.

References

House fair (1952, December 30). The Age, 5. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article205435331

N

Norman, Jean Olive (1923– )

Alternative names: Jean MacGregor; Mrs Howard Norman; Jean Downing

Jean MacGregor was an early graduate in social work from the University of Melbourne (Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, 2016). In 1950, she and her first husband (Arthur) Howard Norman established the Jean and Howard Norman Trust. In 1960, the Trust presented £5000 to the International House Building Appeal (“Christmas gift”, 1960).

References

Christmas gift of £5000 (1960, November 26). The Age, 7.

Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, The University of Melbourne. (2016). Citation for the award of the Hyslop Medal. https://mdhs.unimelb.edu.au/engage/community/awards-and-honours/jean-downing

P

Pascoe, Lyndal Frances (?–2020)

Alternative names: Lyndal Pearce; Lyndal Bills

Lyndal Pascoe (right) with scholarship winner Morgan Nicholson, 2016.

As a student at the University of Melbourne, Lyndal Pearce (later Pascoe) was Secretary of the Students’ International Fair Committee for the 1953 IH Fair and Secretary of the General Committee for the 1954 Fair (“International House ‘a necessity’, 1953). She was also active in the Victoria League for Commonwealth Friendship in Australia (“Grammarians”, 1954). Lyndal Pascoe was a member of the International House Council from 1979 to 1986 and established the Lyndal Pascoe Scholarship to support International House returning students. (International House, 2020).

References

Grammarians (1954, July 3). The Age, 9. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article205697627

International House ‘a necessity’ (1953, December 3). The Argus, 8. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article23321644

International House, The University of Melbourne (2020, September 3). Farewell Mrs Lyndal Pascoe. https://ihouse.unimelb.edu.au/assets/news-items/farewell-ms-lyndal-pascoe2

Paton, Alice (1905–1994)

Alternative names: Alice Watson; Mrs George Paton; Mrs G. W. Paton; Lady Paton

Written by Allegra McCormack

Black and white photograph of four women, including Lady Alice Paton, standing in front of a table set for a formal dinner.
Lady Alice Paton (third from left) at International House, The University of Chicago with (left-right) Mrs Lawrence A. Kimpton, Mrs Marshall Field and Mrs Glen Lloyd, 1958. International House Archives.

Alice Paton played a key role within several International House fundraising projects. Born Alice Watson, she attended Warrnambool High School and studied a Bachelor of Science at the University of Melbourne. In 1931 she married George Whitecross Paton, who in 1951 became the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Melbourne. Following his appointment, Alice Paton became increasingly involved with women’s committees at the University. Her roles were extensive and included leading the provisional council at St Hilda’s College for the admittance of women throughout the 1950s, President of the Victorian Women’s Graduates Association in 1953 and President of the Women of University Fund from 1951 to 1968. She also headed the organising committee for the 1953 fair to raise money for International House (“Fair plans progress”, 1952).

Alice Paton’s involvement with International House continued into the 1960s. She attended the opening of the International House Building Fund appeal and hosted a market fundraiser to support the Building Fund within her own home. In 1973, Alice Paton was awarded an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from the University of Melbourne in recognition of her dedicated service (University of Melbourne, 1974, 33).

References

Fair plans progress (1952, November 20). The Age, 5. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article205430993

Poynter, J. R. (2012). Paton, Sir George Whitecross (1902–1985). In Australian Dictionary of Biography. National Centre of Biography, Australian National University. https://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/paton-sir-george-whitecross-15033/text26230

University of Melbourne (1974). Calendar. http://hdl.handle.net/11343/23421

S

Scheps, Ida (1891–1962)

Alternative names: Isabella Robinson; Isabella Scheps; Mrs T. A. Scheps

Portrait of Ida Scheps, n.d., Ivan Gerassimoff. International House Archives.

Ida Scheps (née Isabella Robinson) was married to the businessman and International House supporter Theodor Alexander (Ted) Scheps (?–1969). Theodor Scheps made his first donation to International House in 1962, asking that it be regarded as ‘a memorial to his late wife’ (Dimmick, 1970). As a result, the Junior Common Room was renamed ‘Ida Scheps Hall’ (Dimmick, 1970). In 1966, Theodor Scheps donated money to allow International House to purchase the house at 197–205 Royal Parade for extra student accommodation. This wing was named the Ida Scheps Wing, later Ida Scheps House (Larkins, 2018, 51). The name ‘Scheps Wing’ was transferred to the sixteen-sided accommodation building opened in 1972.

References

Dimmick, S. G. McL. (1970). Minute of appreciation: Theodor Alexander Scheps. Minutes of the International House Council. International House Archives.

Larkins, F. (2018). International House Melbourne: Sixty years of fraternitas. Melbourne University Publishing.

Scheps, Isabella (Ida) [death notice] (1962, February 20). The Age, 14.

Sloane, Kathleen Phyllis (?–1995)

Alternative names: Kathleen Roche; Mrs W. H. Sloane

Kathleen Sloane (left), Olive Wykes (centre) and Mabel Grimwade (right), The Argus, 1 July 1953

Kathleen Sloane (née Roche) was the first president of the International House Auxiliaries (“International House plans”, 1953). Before she became involved in fundraising for International House, she was active in supporting the Women of the University Appeal (“Saturday’s fetes”, 1939). She was ‘honorary organiser’ for the 1953 International House Fair (“House fair”, 1952) and an executive member of the International House Building Fund Women’s Committee in the early 1960s (Jackson, 1961). In 1974, she was awarded an Order of the British Empire for services to the community (“Queen’s Birthday Honors List”, 1974).

References

House fair (1952, December 30). The Age, 5. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article205435331

International House plans (1953, July 16). The Argus, 4. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article23256179

Jackson, M. (1961, June 19). International House Building Fund Women’s Committee: President’s report. International House Archives.

Personal announcements: Engagements, marriages, births, deaths (1995, November 6). The Age, 16.

Queen’s Birthday Honors list: Doctors, councillors honored. (1974, June 15). The Age, 4.

Saturday’s fetes: Australian tea at Kew (1939, November 13). The Age, 4. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article205590565

Stahl, Gwendoline Linda (Gwen) (1898–1986)

Alternative names: Gwen Pelling; Mrs F. W. Stahl; Mrs Frederick Stahl

Gwen Stahl (née Pelling) was a president of the International House Auxiliaries and one of the inaugural members of the International House Council (Larkins, 2018, 37). At the 1953 International Fair, she organised a number of ‘refreshment stalls’ raising £1000 (the equivalent of almost $38,000 in 2020) 1 for the International House Appeal (“Fair raises £12,250”, 1953). She went on to open a coffee stall at the Union Theatre at the University of Melbourne to raise further funds for International House (“International House plans”, 1953).

In 1959, Gwen Stahl was made a Member of the Order of the British Empire ‘in recognition of her meritorious service to International House as president of the women’s auxiliary in 1955, and as president of the refreshment group of the women’s auxiliary’ (“Snowy Mountains workers honoured”, 1959). In 1962, the International House Council named a tutorial room in the Samuel Wadham Wing the ‘Gwen Stahl Tutorial Room’. When she left the International House Council in 1973, members paid tribute to Gwen Stahl saying: ‘Her faith in the ideals of International House never faltered and her optimistic approach and hard work did much to ensure the establishment of the college’.

Gwen Stahl’s daughter, also named Gwen, was a member of the housing sub-committee of the SRC at the University of Melbourne (“Students support hostel plan”, 1951) and worked for the International House Appeal in the early 1950s (“Job’s fun”, 1952).

References

Fair raises £12,250 (1953, May 4). The Argus, 8. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article23242195

International House plans (1953, July 16). The Argus, 4. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article23256179

Job’s fun (1952, July 23). The Argus, 6. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article23179084

Larkins, F. (2018). International House Melbourne: Sixty years of fraternitas. Melbourne University Publishing.

Snowy Mountains workers honoured (1959, January 1). The Age, 3.

Students support hostel plan (1951, October 29). The Herald (Melbourne), 8. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article247849248

Stevenson, Hilda Mabel (1893–1987)

Alternative names: Hilda McKay; Mrs G. I. Stevenson; Mrs George Stevenson; Hilda ‘Rudd’ Stevenson; Dame Hilda Stevenson

Dame Hilda Stevenson, 1973, Norman Wodetzki,
1994.0025.00075. University of Melbourne Archives.

Hilda Stevenson (née McKay) was a supporter of many organisations in Melbourne including the Royal Children’s Hospital, the Victoria Arts Centre and International House (Heywood & Lemon, 2002/2015). She was a patron of the 1961 International House Building Fund (Jackson, 1961) and a donor to the 1966 Property Acquisition Fund. In 1967, the International House Council agreed to name a building at International House ‘Rudd Stevenson House’. This later became the ‘Hilda Stevenson Building’ or ‘Hilda’s’ (Larkins, 2018, 53–4). In 1968, Hilda Stevenson was made a Dame Commander of the British Empire (“Philanthropist is made Dame”, 1968). In 1969, she helped to fund a new squash court at International House.

References

Heywood, A. & Lemon, B. (2002/2015). Stevenson, Hilda Mabel (1893–1987). In The Australian Women’s Register. Australian Women’s Archives Project. http://www.womenaustralia.info/biogs/IMP0052b.htm

Jackson, M. (1961, June 19). International House Building Fund Women’s Committee: President’s report. International House Archives.

Larkins, F. (2018). International House Melbourne: Sixty years of fraternitas. Melbourne University Publishing.

Philanthropist is made Dame (1968, January 1). The Age, 9.

Stirling, Lorna (1893–1956)

Lorna Stirling was a musician and academic. When she died in 1956, she left most of her estate to the University of Melbourne to support International House and establish a scholarship for student exchange (Robinson, 2002). In 1960, a recording of Lorna Stirling’s ‘satirical songs’ was produced, with the funds from its sale going to International House (Reid, et al., 1960). In 1969, a music room at International House was named after her (International House Executive and Finance Committee, 1969).

References

International House Council (1969, September 12). Executive and Finance Committee: Meeting no. 5, 1 July 1969. International House Archives.

Reid, G., Macartney, K. L. & Scott, M. (1960). Lorna Stirling’s satirical songs [Album]. Peter Mann Recordings.

Robinson, S. (2002). Stirling, Lorna Mary Belton (1893–1956). In Australian Dictionary of Biography. National Centre of Biography, Australian National University. https://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/stirling-lorna-mary-belton-11774/text21059

T

Tipping, Marjorie Jean

Alternative names: Marjorie McCredie; Mrs E. W. Tipping

Marjorie Tipping studied at the University of Melbourne and worked as a social welfare officer before marrying Edmond William (Bill) Tipping in 1942 (“Australian woman’s job”, 1952; Davison, 2002/2006). Marjorie Tipping was the newspaper liaison officer for the fundraising International House Market Fair in 1953 (“International House market fair”, 1953).

References

Australian woman’s job in Harvard University library (1952, July 23). The Sun (Sydney), 31. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article229784895

Davison, G. (2002/2006). Tipping, Edmond William (Bill) (1915–1970). In Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University. https://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/tipping-edmond-william-bill-11868/text21249

International House market fair (1953, May 9). University of Melbourne Gazette 9(4),31-33.

W

Wadham, Dorothy Fanny (c. 1890–1983)

Alternative names: Dorothy Baylis; Mrs S. M. Wadham; Lady Wadham

Dorothy Wadham, early 1950s.

Dorothy Baylis (later Wadham) worked as a schoolteacher before marrying the agricultural scientist Samuel Wadham in 1919 (Humphreys, 2002/2006). She was a patron of the 1961 Building Fund (Jackson, 1961) and in 1967 donated to International House a silver gong used at formal dinners (Warden’s report, 1967).

References

Humphreys, L. R. (2002/2006). Wadham, Sir Samuel Macmahon (1891–1972). In Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University. https://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/wadham-sir-samuel-macmahon-11930/text21375

Jackson, M. (1961, June 19). International House Building Fund Women’s Committee: President’s report. International House Archives.

Warden’s report no. 2 (1967, June). International House Council Meeting No. 2, 14 July 1967. International House Archives.

Wykes, Olive (1921–2016)

Alternative names: Dr Olive Wykes; Olive Mence

Written by Allegra McCormack

Olive Wykes (centre front) with a group of University of Melbourne students, 1954. International House Archives.

Born in 1921, Olive Wykes studied French and Latin at the University of Melbourne during the late 1930s and early 1940s. During her studies she was a resident of Janet Clarke Hall and later became a Fellow of the college. Her involvement with International House began with its foundation. In 1953 she worked as an honorary secretary for the International House May Fair, serving as a liaison between the International House central committee and fundraising auxiliaries (“International House plans”, 1953). Olive Wykes also organised and accompanied international students on fundraising tours across Victorian regional centres (“Ex-school inspector in concert party”, 1954). In 1960 Olive Wykes was part of the International House Women’s Committee, working to raise money for the planned expansion and later attended the opening of the International House Building Fund appeal that same year. Olive Wykes was a keen proponent for the admission of women to universities and residential colleges, including International House. In 1963 she wrote articles in The Age newspaper urging parents to encourage their daughters to stay longer in school and seeking to promote the value of women’s education. In 2000 Olive Wykes was awarded a medal of the Order of Australia. She also received University of Melbourne Award in 2017, an award acknowledged by a bronze plaque laid in Professor’s Walk.

References

Ex-school inspector in concert party (1954, May 26). Horsham Times, 2. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74787291

Flesch, Juliet, (2018), Olive Wykes Mence (1921–2016), The University of Melbourne, https://www.isfar.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/FAR63_Flesch_Olive-Wykes-obituary.pdf

International House plans (1953, July 16). The Argus, 4. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article23256179

  1. According to the Reserve Bank of Australia Pre-decimal Inflation Calculator, https://www.rba.gov.au/can/annualPreDecimal.html