Posted under Research

  1. Finding “Nosy Tiger’s” and other oddly named freshwater invertebrates

    Words – Eddie Tsrline Images – Eddie Tsyrlin and John Gooderham  Towbiters, water scorpions and Nosy Tigers. These are just some the colourful names given to …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2019/11/22/finding-nosy-tigers-and-other-oddly-named-freshwater-invertebrates

  2. Establishment of Wolbachia Strain wAlbB in Malaysian Populations of Aedes aegypti for Dengue Control

    Our freshly published open access paper in Current Biology is the culmination of several years of work with a large team of very talented and dedicated …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2019/11/22/establishment-of-wolbachia-strain-walbb-in-malaysian-populations-of-aedes-aegypti-for-dengue-control

  3. Rediscovering a ‘lost’ species

    This article was first published on Pursuit. Read the original article. Associate Professor Michael Kearney and Professor Ary Hoffmann People usually go to cemeteries to visit …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2019/09/19/rediscovering-a-lost-species

  4. Releases of Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes for disease control

    Words and images: Perran Ross When animals raised in captivity are released back into the wild, you might picture cute and furry mammals from an endangered …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2019/09/18/releases-of-wolbachia-infected-mosquitoes-for-disease-control

  5. Using bacteria to control mosquitoes Dr Tom Schmidt and Professor Ary Hoffmann “This article was first published on Pursuit. Read the original article.” Living inside the …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2019/07/18/910

  6. Using genomics to determine the adaptive potential of populations

    Words: Ary Hoffmann One of the central tenets of conservation biology is that high levels of genetic variation in natural populations is important for their long-term …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2019/06/27/using-genomics-to-determine-the-adaptive-potential-of-populations

  7. MSc projects 2020 – Students wanted

    We are seeking motivated MSc students to apply for several projects starting next year. Enquiries via pearg-queries@unimelb.edu.au Project 1/4: Exploring bacterial symbionts for agricultural pest control …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2019/06/14/msc-projects-2020-students-wanted

  8. Cracking the kinship code: Measuring animal dispersal across generations with DNA

    NEW paper! Dispersal is a key component of the ecology and evolution of animal populations. It allows animals to colonize new habitats, escape deteriorating conditions, and …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2019/05/31/cracking-the-kinship-code-measuring-animal-dispersal-across-generations-with-dna

  9. Stowaway mozzies enter Australia from Asian holiday spots – and they’re resistant to insecticides

    Original article published on The Conversation Words: Tom Schmidt, Andrew Weeks, and Ary Hoffmann We might not be able to use common insecticides to kill mosquitoes …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2019/03/26/stowaway-mozzies-enter-australia-from-asian-holiday-spots-and-theyre-resistant-to-insecticides

  10. Collecting Rhynchosciara: an important fly in the history of genetics

    Words and images: Ann Stocker Rhynchosciara species are endemic to South and Central America. The larvae are readily observed because they are a centimeter or more …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/11/06/collecting-rhynchosciara-an-important-fly-in-the-history-of-genetics

Number of posts found: 31