Posted under Research

  1. Using unsorted sweep-net samples to rapidly assess macroinvertebrate biodiversity

    Words: Melissa Carew Freshwater invertebrates are the insects, snails, clams, mites, crustaceans, and worms that inhabit streams, rivers, ponds and wetlands. They play an important role …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2021/08/11/using-unsorted-sweep-net-samples-to-rapidly-assess-macroinvertebrate-biodiversity

  2. Improving mosquito control strategies with population genomics

    Words: Tom Schmidt When researchers want to investigate evolutionary processes like adaptation and dispersal, they frequently make use of population genomic methods. Population genomics uses DNA …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2021/06/28/improving-mosquito-control-strategies-with-population-genomics

  3. Fly infertility shows we’re underestimating how badly climate change harms animals

    Belinda van Heerwaarden, The University of Melbourne and Ary Hoffmann, The University of Melbourne Evidence of declining fertility in humans and wildlife is growing. While chemicals …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2021/06/10/fly-infertility-shows-were-underestimating-how-badly-climate-change-harms-animals

  4. Variety is the spice of life… and key to saving wildlife

    “This article was first published on Pursuit. Read the original article.” Dr Andrew Weeks and Professor Ary Hoffmann In the critical battle against extinction, conservationists use …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2021/06/10/variety-is-the-spice-of-life-and-key-to-saving-wildlife

  5. The complexities of predicting climate change effects

    This article was first published on Pursuit. Read the original article. Words: Dr James Camac, Nicholas Bell and Professor Ary Hoffmann We currently face significant challenges …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2021/03/31/the-complexities-of-predicting-climate-change-effects

  6. Graduate researcher life in lockdown(s)

    Words and images: Véronique Paris and Christin Manthey Illustraions: Marianne Coquilleau Doing a PhD in science is a challenge in itself. Developing and managing your own …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2020/10/27/graduate-researcher-life-in-lockdowns

  7. A self-spreading bacterial infection in an agricultural pest that stops the pest from spreading plant viruses

    Natasha Wright, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License

    Words: Ary Hoffmann Banner image: Natasha Wright, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. In Asia, one of the most damaging pests of rise is the …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2020/10/09/a-self-spreading-bacterial-infection-in-an-agricultural-pest-that-stops-the-pest-from-spreading-plant-viruses

  8. The resistance advantage – a field genetic background is important for survival of our Wolbachia mosquitoes in Malaysia and reduction of dengue

    Banner image: Nancy with scientists from the Wolbachia dengue program at the Institute for Medical Research, Ministry of Health, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Words and photos: Nancy …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2020/08/28/the-resistance-advantage-a-field-genetic-background-is-important-for-survival-of-our-wolbachia-mosquitoes-in-malaysia-and-reduction-of-dengue

  9. The grasshopper that was lost, then found, is now endangered

    This article was first published on Pursuit. Read the original article. By Professor Ary Hoffmann, Vanessa White and Professor Michael Kearney The Key’s Matchstick Grasshopper, or …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2020/08/21/the-grasshopper-that-was-lost-then-found-is-now-endangered

  10. Targeting the bacteria inside insects for improved pest management

    This article was first published on Pursuit. Read the original article Francesca Noakes and Professor Ary Hoffmann Any home gardener knows of the long-running battle against …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2020/08/21/targeting-the-bacteria-inside-insects-for-improved-pest-management

Number of posts found: 50