Posted under Research

  1. Using bacteria to control mosquitoes Dr Tom Schmidt and Professor Ary Hoffmann “This article was first published on Pursuit. Read the original article.” Living inside the …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2019/07/18/910

  2. Using genomics to determine the adaptive potential of populations

    Words: Ary Hoffmann One of the central tenets of conservation biology is that high levels of genetic variation in natural populations is important for their long-term …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2019/06/27/using-genomics-to-determine-the-adaptive-potential-of-populations

  3. MSc projects 2020 – Students wanted

    We are seeking motivated MSc students to apply for several projects starting next year. Enquiries via pearg-queries@unimelb.edu.au Project 1/4: Exploring bacterial symbionts for agricultural pest control …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2019/06/14/msc-projects-2020-students-wanted

  4. Cracking the kinship code: Measuring animal dispersal across generations with DNA

    NEW paper! Dispersal is a key component of the ecology and evolution of animal populations. It allows animals to colonize new habitats, escape deteriorating conditions, and …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2019/05/31/cracking-the-kinship-code-measuring-animal-dispersal-across-generations-with-dna

  5. Stowaway mozzies enter Australia from Asian holiday spots – and they’re resistant to insecticides

    Original article published on The Conversation Words: Tom Schmidt, Andrew Weeks, and Ary Hoffmann We might not be able to use common insecticides to kill mosquitoes …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2019/03/26/stowaway-mozzies-enter-australia-from-asian-holiday-spots-and-theyre-resistant-to-insecticides

  6. Collecting Rhynchosciara: an important fly in the history of genetics

    Words and images: Ann Stocker Rhynchosciara species are endemic to South and Central America. The larvae are readily observed because they are a centimeter or more …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/11/06/collecting-rhynchosciara-an-important-fly-in-the-history-of-genetics

  7. The diversity of Aussie grasshoppers | Part two

    Words and images: Vanessa White Some important lessons learnt and new questions around Vandiemenella laboratory rearing In the previous grasshopper blog, I reported “reasonable success with …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/10/15/the-diversity-of-aussie-grasshoppers-part-two

  8. The diversity of Aussie grasshoppers | Part one

    Words: Vanessa White Images: Mike Kearney and Vanessa White Why Australian grasshoppers are fantastic research subjects: The Morabine grasshoppers (subfamily Morabinae) commonly known as “matchstick grasshoppers” …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/10/08/the-diversity-of-aussie-grasshoppers-part-one

  9. Marking mosquitoes

    Words: Mengjia Liu Images: Perran Ross and Mengjia Liu It is important to study the fitness of different colonies of Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes, and also of interest …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/10/05/marking-mosquitoes

  10. BACK FROM THE BRINK | CROWDFUNDING FOR THE GENETIC RESCUE OF EASTERN BARRED BANDICOOTS

    Words: Anne Aulsebrook Cover image: Mount Rothwell Conservation and Research Centre An article published in 1934 describes the flavour of bandicoot stew. ‘After chewing a mouthful …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/10/03/back-from-the-brink-crowdfunding-for-the-genetic-rescue-of-eastern-barred-bandicoots

Number of posts found: 27