Category: Research

  1. Looking for a funded PhD or MPhil scholarship?

    The Australian Grains Pest Innovation Program (AGPIP) is offering 4 fully funded scholarships at the University of Melbourne for potential PhD or MPhil students interested in cutting-edge science, environmental sustainability and agricultural innovation. AGPIP is a collaboration between the PEARG and cesar. The program is aimed at improving the sustainability of invertebrate pest management practices […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2020/04/06/looking-for-a-phd-or-mphil-scholarship

  2. How do we protect our unique biodiversity from megafires?

    This article was first published on Pursuit. Read the original article. Authors: Dr James Camac, Nicholas Bell and Professor Ary Hoffmann This summer’s devastating Australian fires and their continuing impact on biodiversity serve as a stark reminder of the challenges in nature conservation as we head into an increasingly volatile future driven by climate change. […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2020/02/21/how-do-we-protect-our-unique-biodiversity-from-megafires

  3. New publication: Ecological impacts of pesticides and their mitigation within IPM systems

    Pest control is recognised as an important part of crop production. Against a background of increasing concern for chemical impacts on the environment, Integrated Pest Management programs have been developed where chemical application and natural enemy enhancement work together to maintain productivity with reduced environmental impact. Such programs require good science, general theory and strong […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2020/02/19/new-publication-ecological-impacts-of-pesticides-and-their-mitigation-within-ipm-systems

  4. Dengue-blocking bacteria endure the heat

    “This article was first published on Pursuit. Read the original article.” Dr Perran Stott-Ross and Professor Ary Hoffmann Bushfires. Coral bleaching. Heatwaves. These disastrous events are a harsh reality in Australia. And they’re only going to become more frequent and severe with climate change. Last year, 2019, was Australia’s hottest year ever recorded, and records […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2020/01/24/dengue-blocking-bacteria-endure-the-heat

  5. Wolbachia infections in Aedes aegypti: The ‘Bigfoot’ of endosymbionts

    Words: Perran Ross Wolbachia are endosymbiotic bacteria found within the cells of many insects, from butterflies and bees to cockroaches and dung beetles. Wolbachia are so common because they often provide their insect hosts with an advantage, aiding their spread through populations. Whether an insect carries Wolbachia is an important question, especially if they’re a […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2020/01/21/wolbachia-infections-in-aedes-aegypti-the-bigfoot-of-endosymbionts

  6. Sampling by the sea – collecting mosquitoes in the Mornington Peninsula

    Words and images: Véronique Paris It’s 7.30 Saturday morning – what are your plans for the day? While you may be still in bed contemplating a coffee, or still sound asleep, I’m packing the PEARG ute with a stack of small buckets, strips of red felt, some rabbit food, and a 20lt jerrycan of water. […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2019/12/11/sampling-by-the-sea-collecting-mosquitoes-in-the-mornington-peninsula

  7. Finding “Nosy Tiger’s” and other oddly named freshwater invertebrates

    Words – Eddie Tsrline Images – Eddie Tsyrlin and John Gooderham  Towbiters, water scorpions and Nosy Tigers. These are just some the colourful names given to freshwater insects and other invertebrates. And there is a more serious side to these quirky creatures. The Nosy Tigers are a diving beetle larva with a peculiarly elongated head. […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2019/11/22/finding-nosy-tigers-and-other-oddly-named-freshwater-invertebrates

  8. Establishment of Wolbachia Strain wAlbB in Malaysian Populations of Aedes aegypti for Dengue Control

    Our freshly published open access paper in Current Biology is the culmination of several years of work with a large team of very talented and dedicated researchers. Rather than rehash the story here, please see press releases below: Press release from the UniMelb newsroom  (alternatively at Bio21’s siteBio21’s site or at SciMex) Brief summary article […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2019/11/22/establishment-of-wolbachia-strain-walbb-in-malaysian-populations-of-aedes-aegypti-for-dengue-control

  9. Rediscovering a ‘lost’ species

    This article was first published on Pursuit. Read the original article. Associate Professor Michael Kearney and Professor Ary Hoffmann People usually go to cemeteries to visit or bury their dead but, in the name of research, we visited 25 cemeteries in Victoria, NSW and the ACT to try and find a tiny rare species of […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2019/09/19/rediscovering-a-lost-species

  10. Releases of Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes for disease control

    Words and images: Perran Ross When animals raised in captivity are released back into the wild, you might picture cute and furry mammals from an endangered species. But in many countries around the world, people are releasing mosquitoes raised in laboratories into the environment. These mosquitoes feed on human blood and are vectors of dengue, […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2019/09/18/releases-of-wolbachia-infected-mosquitoes-for-disease-control

Number of posts found: 57