Nancy Endersby-Harshman

 

Nancy Endersby-Harshman, Research Fellow and Laboratory manager

Email Phone

Nancy is a Research Fellow in the Pest and Environmental Adaptation Research Group in the Hoffmann Laboratory, Bio21 Institute, School of BioSciences at the University of Melbourne. Nancy has a background in horticultural entomology and a PhD from Monash University on the genetic structure of Australian populations of the horticultural pest, the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella. Nancy currently conducts research on the dengue vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti, in the fields of insecticide resistance, population genetics, Wolbachia pipientis and vector ecology. She has also conducted insecticide resistance training sessions for scientists at the Institute for Medical Research in Kuala Lumpur and engages in collaborative research with this group associated with the Wolbachia release program. Nancy manages PEARG’s Molecular Laboratory and the Arboviral Research Laboratory, a Biosecurity Approved Arrangement with the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources. As site contact, she is responsible for staff training and compliance in this facility which is certified at Biosecurity Containment Level 2 (BC2 & BIC2) for classes 5.2 Microbiological and 7.2 Invertebrate containment requirements and is an OGTR-certified PC2 Invertebrate Facility.

Current Projects

Our laboratory studies release of Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes (Aedes aegypti) to reduce the impact of dengue virus. Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes do not transmit dengue and we aim to replace the natural population of the dengue vector with the same mosquito species in which virus replication is blocked. The Wolbachia strategy relies on the released mosquitoes being fit and competitive in the field and different strains of the Wolbachia bacterium may have differing fitness costs to the mosquito. So, an important part of our research is to do with maintaining a high level of quality in our mosquitoes for release.

After Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes were released with success in Cairns, the program was mobilised with releases occurring in parts of Asia and South America where different levels of success in establishment of the Wolbachia mosquito lines have been experienced. Consequently, we now investigate environmental factors which may act as barriers to establishment of Wolbachia strains in the environment in an effort to find strains that will perform robustly in the field.

Current projects in this field look at

  1. Effect of environmental levels of antibiotic contamination on Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes
  2. Background levels of insecticide resistance in Aedes aegypti at potential release sites with a particular focus on pyrethroid insecticides and target site resistance
  3. Other insecticide resistance projects include:
    1. Assessment of resistance status of Ae. aegypti which arrive in Australia as exotic incursions in comparison with the local population of Ae. aegypti mosquitoes in Queensland.

Outbreaks of dengue fever have occurred in Queensland, Australia, since the late 1800s, leading to ongoing attempts to control the mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti (L.). Since the 1990s, pyrethroid insecticides have been used for this purpose, but have been applied in a strategic manner with a variety of delivery methods including indoor residual spraying, lethal ovitraps and use of insect growth regulators as larvicides. Separate selection experiments that we conducted on mosquitoes from Queensland, using Type I and Type II pyrethroids did not produce resistant lines of Ae. aegypti and bioassays of field material from Queensland showed only weak tolerance in comparison with a susceptible line. There was no evidence of knockdown resistance (kdr) mutations in Ae. aegypti from Queensland, in stark contrast to the situation in nearby southeast Asia. We suspect that careful management of pyrethroid insecticide use combined with surveillance and interception of exotic incursions has helped to maintain pyrethroid (and particularly kdr – based) susceptibility in Ae. aegypti in Australia.

  1. Assessment of pyrethroid target-site resistance genotypes in Ae. aegypti in the Indo-Pacific region
  2. Studies of pyrethroid resistance status of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus in Papua New Guinea and Malaysia

 

Publications:

Refereed Journals (first, joint first or senior author)

Endersby-Harshman, N. M., J. K. Axford, and A. A. Hoffmann. 2019. Environmental concentrations of antibiotics may diminish Wolbachia infections in Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae). Journal of Medical Entomology 56: 1078-1086.

Endersby-Harshman NM, Weeks AR, Hoffmann AA (2018). The detection and significance of emerging insecticide resistance in mosquitoes. Microbiology Australia. (Invited review article).

Endersby-Harshman, NM, Wuliandari JR, Harshman LG, Frohn V, Johnson BJ, Ritchie SA, Hoffmann AA. 2017. Pyrethroid susceptibility has been maintained in the dengue vector, Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae), in Queensland, Australia. Journal of Medical Entomology 54: 1649-1658.

Rašić G*, Endersby-Harshman NM*, Tantowijoyo W, Goundar A, White VL, Yang Q, Filipović I, Johnson P, Hoffmann AA, Arguni E (2015) Aedes aegypti has spatially structured and seasonally stable populations in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Parasites & Vectors 12/2015; 8(1). DOI:10.1186/s13071-015-1230-6 *Joint first authors.

Rochmijati Wuliandari J, Lee SF, White VL, Tantowijoyo W, Hoffmann AA, Endersby-Harshman NM (2015). Association between three mutations, F1565C, V1023G and S996P, in the voltage-sensitive sodium channel gene and knockdown resistance in Aedes aegypti from Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Wang C, ed. Insects. 2015; 6 (3): 658-685. doi:10.3390/insects6030658.

Endersby NM, White VL, Chan J, Hurst T, Rašić G, Miller A, Hoffmann AA (2013). Evidence of cryptic genetic lineages within Aedes notoscriptus (Skuse). Infection, Genetics and Evolution 18: 191-201.

Endersby NM & Hoffmann AA (2013). Effect of Wolbachia on insecticide susceptibility in lines of Aedes aegypti. Bulletin of Entomological Research 103 (3), 269-277.

Endersby NM, Hoffmann AA, White VL, Ritchie S, Johnson PH, Rapley LP, Weeks AR (2011). Changes in the genetic structure of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) populations in Queensland, Australia, across two seasons: Implications for potential mosquito releases. Journal of Medical Entomology 48 (5): 999-1007.

Endersby NM, Viduka K, Baxter SW, Saw J, Heckel DG & McKechnie SW (2011). Widespread pyrethroid resistance in Australian diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.), is related to multiple mutations in the para sodium channel gene. Bulletin of Entomological Research 101: 393–405.

Endersby NM, Hoffmann AA, White VL, Lowenstein S, Ritchie S, Johnson PH, Rapley LP, Ryan PA, Nam VS, Yen NT, Kittiyapong P, Weeks AR (2009). Genetic structure of Aedes aegypti in Australia and Vietnam revealed by microsatellite and Exon Primed Intron Crossing markers suggests feasibility of local control options. Journal of Medical Entomology 46 (5): 1074-1083.

Endersby NM, Ridland PM and Hoffmann AA (2008). The effects of local selection versus dispersal on insecticide resistance patterns: longitudinal evidence from diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae)) in Australia evolving resistance to pyrethroids. Bulletin of Entomological Research 98: 145 – 157.

Endersby NM, Hoffmann AA, McKechnie SW and Weeks AR (2007). Is there genetic structure in populations of Helicoverpa armigera in Australia? Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata 122: 253-263.

Endersby NM, McKechnie SW, Ridland PM and Weeks AR (2006). Microsatellites reveal a lack of structure in Australian populations of the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.). Molecular Ecology 15: 107-118.

Endersby NM, McKechnie SW, Vogel H, Gahan LJ, Baxter SW, Ridland PM and Weeks AR (2005). Microsatellites isolated from diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.), for studies of dispersal in Australian populations. Molecular Ecology Notes 5: 51-53.

Endersby NM, Morgan WC, Stevenson BC and Waters CT (1992). Alternatives to regular insecticide applications for control of lepidopterous pests of Brassica oleracea var. capitata. Biological Agriculture and Horticulture 8: 189-203.

Endersby NM and Morgan WC (1991). Alternatives to synthetic chemical insecticides for use in crucifer crops. Biological Agriculture and Horticulture 8: 33-52.

Endersby NM, New TR and Thornton IWB (1990). Psocoptera from the Grampians and Mt. Arapiles, western Victoria – a biogeographic analysis. Journal of the Australian Entomological Society 29: 215-224.

Refereed Journals – co-author

Demok S, Endersby-Harshman N, Vinit R, et al. Insecticide resistance status of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes in Papua New Guinea. Parasites & Vectors. 2019;12(1):333. Published 2019 Jul 3. doi:10.1186/s13071-019-3585-6.

Li, Y., J. Zhu, C. Ge, Y. Wang, Z. Zhao, S. Ma, A. A. Hoffmann, N. M. Endersby, Q. Liu, W. Yu, and W. Jiang. 2019. Molecular phylogeny and historical biogeography of the butterfly Tribe Aeromachini Tutt (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae) from China. Cells 8.

Schmidt, T. L., A. R. van Rooyen, J. Chung, N. M. Endersby-Harshman, P. C. Griffin, A. Sly, A. A. Hoffmann, and A. R. Weeks. 2019. Tracking genetic invasions: Genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms reveal the source of pyrethroid-resistant Aedes aegypti (yellow fever mosquito) incursions at international ports. Evolutionary Applications 12: 1136– 1146.

Richardson KM, Griffin PC, Lee SF, Ross PA, Endersby-Harshman NM, Schiffer M, Hoffmann AA (2018). A Wolbachia infection from Drosophila that causes cytoplasmic incompatibility despite low prevalence and densities in males. Heredity , DOI:10.1038/s41437-018-0133-7.

Hoffmann AA, Endersby-Harshman NM, Yeap HL (2018). The Effect of nonrandom mating on Wolbachia dynamics: Implications for population replacement and sterile releases in Aedes mosquitoes. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 9 (3): DOI:10.4269/ajtmh.18-0178.

Weibin Jiang, Jianqing Zhu, Yajuan Wu, Lizhen Li, Yuanyuan Li, Chen Ge, Ying Wang, Nancy M. Endersby, Ary A. Hoffmann, Weidong Yu (2018). Influence of Wolbachia Infection on Mitochondrial DNA Variation in the Genus Polytremis (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 129, DOI:10.1016/j.ympev.2018.08.001.

Arnold, A., A. Kodym, N. M. Endersby-Harshman, J. Delpratt, and A. A. Hoffmann. 2017. Genetic structure of Gahnia radula (Cyperaceae), a key sedge for revegetation. Australian Journal of Botany 65: 128-139.

Ross, P. A., J. K. Axford, K. M. Richardson, N. M. Endersby-Harshman, and A. A. Hoffmann. 2017. Maintaining Aedes aegypti mosquitoes infected with Wolbachia. Journal of visualized experiments: JoVE.

Ross, P.A., I. Wiwatanaratanabutr, J.K. Axford, V.L. White, N.M. Endersby-Harshman, and A.A. Hoffmann, 2017, Wolbachia infections in Aedes aegypti differ markedly in their response to cyclical heat stress. PLOS Pathogens, 13 (1): p. e1006006.

Ross, P., N.M. Endersby, and A.A. Hoffmann, 2016, Costs of three Wolbachia infections on the survival of Aedes aegypti larvae under starvation conditions. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, Vol 10, Iss 1, p e0004320 (2016), (1): p. e0004320.

H L Yeap, G Rašić, N M Endersby-Harshman, S F Lee, E Arguni, H Le Nguyen, A A Hoffmann: Mitochondrial DNA variants help monitor the dynamics of Wolbachia invasion into host populations. Heredity 11/2015; DOI:10.1038/hdy.2015.97

Gordana Rasic, Renata Schama, Rosanna Powell, Rafael Maciel-de Freitas, Nancy M. Endersby-Harshman, Igor Filipović, Gabriel Sylvestre, Renato C. Máspero, Ary A. Hoffmann: Contrasting genetic structure between mitochondrial and nuclear markers in the dengue fever mosquito from Rio de Janeiro: Implications for vector control. Evolutionary Applications 08/2015; 8(9). DOI:10.1111/eva.12301

Ross, PA, Endersby, N. M., Yeap, H. L., & Hoffmann, A. A. (2014). Larval competition extends developmental time and decreases adult size of wMelPop Wolbachia-infected Aedes aegypti. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 91(1), 198-205.

Rasic, G., Endersby NM, Williams C, & Hoffmann AA (2014). Using Wolbachia-based release for suppression of Aedes mosquitoes: insights from genetic data and population simulations. Ecological applications, 24 (5), 1226-1234.

Yeap HL, Axford JK, Popovici J, Endersby NM, Iturbe-Ormaetxe I, Ritchie SA, . . . Hoffmann AA (2014). Assessing quality of life-shortening Wolbachia-infected Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in the field based on capture rates and morphometric assessments. Parasites & Vectors 7, 13 pages. doi:10.1186/1756-305-7-58.

White VL, Endersby NM, Chan J, Hoffmann AA, & Weeks AR (2014). Developing Exon-Primed Intron-Crossing (EPIC) markers for population genetic studies in three Aedes disease vectors. Insect Science. doi:10.1111/1744-7917.12145.

Díaz F, Endersby NM & Hoffmann AA (2014). Genetic structure of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci populations in Colombia following a recent invasion. Insect Science. doi:10.1111/1744-7917.12129.

Olanratmanee P, Kittayapong P, Chansang C, Hoffmann AA, Weeks AR & Endersby NM 2013. Population genetic structure of Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti (L.) at a micro-spatial scale in Thailand: implications for a dengue suppression strategy. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 7, e1913.

Lee SF, White VL, Weeks AR, Hoffmann AA & Endersby NM (2012). High-throughput PCR assays to monitor Wolbachia infection in the dengue mosquito (Aedes aegypti) and Drosophila simulans. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 78, 4740-4743.

Yeap HL, Mee P, Walker T, Weeks AR, O’Neill SL, Johnson P, Ritchie SA, Richardson KM, Doig C, Endersby NM, Hoffmann AA (2011). Dynamics of the ‘popcorn’ Wolbachia infection in outbred Aedes aegypti informs prospects for mosquito vector control. Genetics 187: 583-595.

Weeks AR, Endersby NM, Lange CL, Lowe A, Zalucki MP & Hoffmann AA (2010). Genetic variation among Helicoverpa armigera populations as assessed by microsatellites: a cautionary tale about accurate allele scoring. Bulletin of Entomological Research 100: 445–450.

Shelton AM, Gujar GT, Chen M, Rauf A, Srinivasan R, Kalia V, Mittal A, Kumari A, Ramesh K, Borkakatti R, Zhao JZ, Endersby N, Russell D, Wu YD & Uijtewaal B. (2009). Assessing the susceptibility of cruciferous Lepidoptera to Cry1Ba2 and Cry1Ca4 for future transgenic cruciferous vegetables. Journal of Economic Entomology 102 (6): 2217-2223.

Furlong MJ, Spafford H, Ridland PM, Endersby NM, Edwards OR, Baker GJ, Keller MA, Paull CA (2008). Ecology of diamondback moth in Australian canola: landscape perspectives and the implications for management. Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture 48: 1494–1505.

Hamilton AJ, Endersby NM, Schellhorn NA, Ridland PM, Rogers PM, Jevremov D and Baker G (2006). Evaluation of fixed sample-size plans for Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) on broccoli crops in Australia. Journal of Economic Entomology 99: 2171-2176.

Saw J, Endersby NM and McKechnie SW (2006). Low mtDNA diversity among widespread Australian diamondback moth Plutella xylostella (L.) suggests isolation and a founder effect. Insect Science 13: 237-241.

Hamilton AJ, Endersby NM, Ridland PM, Zhang J and Neal M (2005). Effects of cultivar on oviposition preference, larval feeding and development time of diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), on some Brassica oleracea vegetables in Victoria. Australian Journal of Entomology 44: 284-287.

Hamilton AJ, Versace V, Hepworth G, Stagnitti F, Dawson J, Ridland PM, Endersby NM, Schellhorn NA, Mansfield C and Rogers PM (2005). Attending to risk in sequential sampling plans. In Environmental Health Risk III, C.A. Brebbia, V. Popov, & D. Fayzieva (eds.). The Sustainable World series, vol. 13. Wessex Institute of Technology. pp. 11-20.

Hamilton AJ, Schellhorn NA, Ridland PM, Endersby NM and Ward SA (2004). A dynamic binomial sequential sampling plan for diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella. Journal of Economic Entomology 96: 127-135.

Vickers R, Ridland PM and Endersby NM (2001). Australia leads the way in the fight against the diamondback moth. Pesticide Outlook 12: 185-187.

Conference Proceedings (Editor)

Endersby NM & Ridland PM eds (2004). The management of diamondback moth and other crucifer pests: Proceedings of the 4th International Workshop, Melbourne, Australia, 26-29 November 2001.

Books

Endersby-Harshman NM (2016) From our special correspondent… The journalism of Arthur Ransome in Egypt. Amazon Publications, Kendal, Cumbria, United Kingdom, 310 pp.

Donald C, Endersby NM, Ridland PM, Porter I and Lawrence J (2000). Field guide to pests, diseases and disorders of vegetable brassicas. Department of Natural Resources and Environment, Victoria, Australia.

Book chapter

Andrew Hamilton, Vincent Versace, Graham Hepworth, Frank Stagnitti, Joanne Dawson, Peter M Ridland, Nancy M Endersby: Attending to risk in sequential sampling plans. Environmental Health Risk III, Edited by C.A. Brebbia, V. Popov, D. Fayzieva, 09/2005: pages 11-20; Wessex Institute of Technology., ISBN: ISBN: 1-84564-026-8

Conferences:

Full papers in Proceedings

Endersby NM (1991). Alternatives to synthetic insecticides: control of cabbage white butterfly and diamondback moth.  Proceedings 1st National Conference Australian Society of Horticultural Science.  Sustainable management of pests, diseases and weeds.  Australian Horticulture Clean and Green in the 90’s. Macquarie University, Sydney, September 30 – October 3 1991, pp. 301-305.

Endersby NM (1991). Reduced use of synthetic insecticides: control of cabbage white butterfly and diamondback moth.  Proceedings 1st National Conference Australian Society of Horticultural Science.  Sustainable management of pests, diseases and weeds.  Australian Horticulture Clean and Green in the 90’s. Macquarie University, Sydney, September 30 – October 3 1991, pp. 385-389.

Endersby NM (1992). Development of action thresholds for Pieris rapae (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) and Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Yponomeutidae). Proceedings of the 5th Australian Applied Entomological Research Conference, Pest Control and Sustainable Agriculture, 27 April – 1 May 1992, Canberra, pp. 148-151.

Endersby NM and Ridland PM (1997). Insecticide resistance in diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.) in southern Australia. In: The Management of Diamondback Moth and other Crucifer Pests: Proceedings of the Third International Workshop (eds A Sivapragasam, WH Loke, AK Hussan & GS Lim). Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, pp. 290-294.

Endersby NM, Ridland PM and Zhang J. (2004). Reduced susceptibility to permethrin in diamondback moth populations from vegetable and non-vegetable hosts in southern Australia. In: The management of diamondback moth and other crucifer pests: Proceedings of the Fourth International Workshop (eds NM Endersby & PM Ridland), 26 – 29 November 2001, Melbourne, Australia, pp. 319-325.

Endersby NM and Cameron PJ (2004). Parasitism of Nyctemera amica (White) (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae) and Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) by Cotesia plutellae (Kurdjumov) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae). In: The management of diamondback moth and other crucifer pests: Proceedings of the Fourth International Workshop (eds NM Endersby & PM Ridland), 26 – 29 November 2001, Melbourne, Australia, pp. 265-268.

Endersby NM, Weeks AR, McKechnie SW and Ridland PM (2003). Development of genetic markers to study dispersal of diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.) in Australia. In: Proceedings of the 13th Biennial Australian Research Assembly on Brassicas, Tamworth NSW, 8-12 Sep-2003, pp. 58-61.

Endersby NM, McKechnie SW and Ridland PM (2004). Population structure and movement of diamondback moth in Australia: beginnings of a molecular marker approach. In: Improving Biocontrol of Plutella xylostella. Proceedings of the International symposium (eds AA Kirk and D Bordat), CIRAD, Montpellier, France, 21-24 October 2002, pp. 167-171.

Endersby NM (2008). Population structure and gene flow in diamondback moth in Australia and around the world – current state of knowledge and directions for the future. In: Management of Diamondback Moth and Other Crucifer Pests: Proceedings of the Fifth International Workshop (eds AM Shelton, HL Collins,Y Zhang and Q Wu), Beijing China, October 24-27, 2006, China Agricultural Science and Technology Press, pp. 132-147.

Ridland PM and Endersby NM (2008). Diamondback Moth: Messages from a land down under. In: Management of Diamondback Moth and Other Crucifer Pests: Proceedings of the Fifth International Workshop (eds AM Shelton, HL Collins,Y Zhang and Q Wu), Beijing China, October 24-27, 2006, China Agricultural Science and Technology Press, pp. 1-29.

Ridland PM and Endersby NM (2008). Seasonal phenology of diamondback moth populations in southern Australia. In: Management of Diamondback Moth and Other Crucifer Pests: Proceedings of the Fifth International Workshop (eds AM Shelton, HL Collins,Y Zhang and Q Wu), Beijing China, October 24-27, 2006, China Agricultural Science and Technology Press, pp. 90-101.

Ridland PM and Endersby NM (2011). Some Australian populations of diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.) show reduced susceptibility to fipronil. In: Proceedings of the Sixth International Workshop on Management of Diamondback Moth and Other Crucifer Pests (eds ), AVRDC World Vegetable Center, pp. 207-215.

Conference Abstracts

Endersby-Harshman NM, Schmidt TL, Weeks AR and Hoffmann AA (2019). Sodium channel mutations in the dengue vector, Aedes aegypti, provide insight to insecticide resistance, incursions and identity. Genetics Society of Australasia Conference, The University of Melbourne, 30 June – 3 July 2019.

Endersby NM & Ridland PM (1994). Insecticide resistance in Victorian populations of diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.). Australian Entomological Society 25th Annual General Meeting and Scientific Conference.  The University of Adelaide, 24-28 September 1994.

Endersby N, Ridland P, Heisswolf S and Houlding B (1996). Plutella – A resistant pest. Vegtec 2000. 1996 National Vegetable & Potato Industry Conference (AUSVEG), Brisbane Convention Centre, 7-9 July 1996.

Endersby NM, Ridland PM and Zhang J (2000) Resistance to permethrin in diamondback moth populations from vegetable and non-vegetable hosts in southern Australia. Australian Entomological Society 31st AGM & Scientific Conference, Northern Territory University, Darwin, 25 – 30 June 2000.

Endersby NM, Ridland PM and Zhang J (2000) Resistance to permethrin in diamondback moth populations from vegetable and non-vegetable hosts in southern Australia. NRE Horticulture Conference, Institute for Horticultural Development, 6-7 September 2000.

Endersby NM, Weeks AR, McKechnie SW and Ridland PM (2002). Population structure and movement of diamondback moth in Australia: beginnings of a molecular marker approach Australian Entomological Society 33rd AGM & Scientific Conference, Fremantle WA, 22-27-Sep-2002.

Endersby NM, Weeks AR, McKechnie SW and Ridland PM (2003). Population structure and movement of diamondback moth in Australia: beginnings of a molecular marker approach. Department of Primary Industries and Department of Sustainability & Environment: Entomology Symposium. Rutherglen, May 7–8, 2003.

Endersby NM, Weeks AR, McKechnie SW and Ridland PM (2003). Development of microsatellites to study population structure and movement of diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.) in Australia, Australian Entomological Society 34th AGM & Scientific Conference, Hobart, Tasmania, 28 Sep-3 Oct –2003.

Endersby NM, McKechnie SW, Ridland PM and Weeks AR (2004). Population structure of Plutella xylostella (L.) investigated using microsatellite markers. XXII International Congress of Entomology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, 15-21 August 2004.

Endersby NM, White VL, Chan J, Hurst TP, Rašić G, Miller AD and Hoffmann AA (2012). Molecular markers provide evidence of cryptic species in Aedes notoscriptus. 11th Arbovirus Research In Australia. 10th Mosquito Control Association of Australia Symposium September 9 – 14, 2012. Outrigger Surfers Paradise, Surfers Paradise QLD, Australia.

 

Selection of Industry Publications

Endersby NM (1989).  Cleaner Agriculture. Rural Quarterly, Spring 1989, Vol. 2, No. 3, p.18.

Endersby NM (1990).  Companion Planting with insect repelling herbs.  Crop Protection Bulletin, August 1990, No. 14, p. 22 & Geelong Advertiser, Tuesday 25 September, 1990.

Endersby NM (1990).  Reduced synthetic insecticide inputs in vegetable growing.  Crop Protection Bulletin, March 1990, No. 14, p. 14.

Endersby NM (1991).  Reducing insecticide use in brassicas. Crop Protection Bulletin, September 1991, No. 26, p. 15.

Endersby NM (1991).  Reduced use of synthetic insecticides: control of cabbage white butterfly and diamondback moth.  Victorian Entomologist 21 (5): 127 – 129.

Endersby NM (1992).  Entomopathogenic fungi.  Natural biological control of brassica pests. Crop Protection Bulletin, September 1992, No. 37, pp. 18 – 19.

Endersby NM (1994).  Insecticide resistance in cabbage moth.  Victorian Vegetable Grower, No. 2, February, 1994, p. 1.

Endersby NM (1994).  Further reports of insecticide resistance in cabbage moth.  Victorian Vegetable Grower April 1994, pp. 4 – 5.

Endersby NM and Ridland PM (1995).  Insecticide resistance in diamondback moths.  A challenge for brassica growers.  Good Fruit & Vegetables Vol.5 No. 9 (February 1995): 22-23.

Endersby NM and Ridland PM (1998). Diamondback moth (DBM) – What’s going on in the 1998/ 99 season? Access to Asian Vegetables Newsletter, Issue 13 (October 1998).

Endersby NM (1998). 1998/99 Diamondback moth insecticide resistance management strategy. Access to Asian Vegetables Newsletter, Issue 15 (December 1998).

Endersby NM (1999).  Start monitoring for diamondback moth. Southern Farmer (p. 4 October 1998 – special Southern Farmer lift-out).

Endersby NM (2001). Dealing with diamondback moth. Southern Farmer, May 2001, p.22

Endersby NM (2001). Scouting for diamondback moth in brassicas. Vegetable Matters – NRE’s news for the Victorian vegetable industries Issue No. 1, June 2001.

Endersby NM (2003). Studying moth movement and insecticide resistance using molecular markers. Brassica IPM National Newsletter Issue 3, July 2003, pp. 2-3.

Endersby NM, McKechnie SW, Ridland PM and Weeks AR (2004). Australia-wide movement of diamondback moth studied using genetic markers. Brassica IPM National Newsletter Issue 5, September 2004, pp.2-3.

Endersby NM (2006) Genetic structure and insecticide resistance in Australian DBM. Brassica IPM National Newsletter Issue 9, August 2006, pp. 3-4.

Awards:

2016 Invitrogen Science Hero (Behind the scenes category)

2005 Department of Primary Industries Daniel McAlpine Outstanding Achievement Award (Member of Sampling Team)

Links:

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Nancy_Endersby-Harshman