Posts tagged with endosymbionts

  1. Releases of Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes for disease control

    Words and images: Perran Ross When animals raised in captivity are released back into the wild, you might picture cute and furry mammals from an endangered …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2019/09/18/releases-of-wolbachia-infected-mosquitoes-for-disease-control

  2. Using bacteria to control mosquitoes Dr Tom Schmidt and Professor Ary Hoffmann “This article was first published on Pursuit. Read the original article.” Living inside the …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2019/07/18/910

  3. MSc projects 2020 – Students wanted

    We are seeking motivated MSc students to apply for several projects starting next year. Enquiries via pearg-queries@unimelb.edu.au Project 1/4: Exploring bacterial symbionts for agricultural pest control …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2019/06/14/msc-projects-2020-students-wanted

  4. Marking mosquitoes

    Words: Mengjia Liu Images: Perran Ross and Mengjia Liu It is important to study the fitness of different colonies of Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes, and also of interest …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/10/05/marking-mosquitoes

  5. A new and unusual Wolbachia bacteria from Drosophila flies limited to the female sex

    Words: Ary Hoffmann Cover image: Perran Ross As Wolbachia bacteria that live inside insect cells continue to be discovered and studied in detail, our appreciation of …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/08/24/a-new-and-unusual-wolbachia-bacteria-from-drosophila-flies-limited-to-the-female-sex

  6. Probing the void for blood

    Words and video: Perran Ross I recently filmed one of our mosquito colonies trying desperately to reach my arm through their enclosure. The video has been …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/07/10/probing-the-void-for-blood

  7. New publication | Fine-scale landscape genomics helps explain the slow spatial spread of Wolbachia through the Aedes aegypti population in Cairns, Australia

    Author summary and figures by Tom Schmidt Wolbachia is a bacterium that suppresses the capacity for arbovirus transmission in the mosquito Aedes aegypti, and can spread spatially through …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/05/25/new-publication-fine-scale-landscape-genomics-helps-explain-the-slow-spatial-spread-of-wolbachia-through-the-aedes-aegypti-population-in-cairns-australia

  8. Collecting fresh mosquitoes | PEARG in the field

    Words: Tom Schmidt Photos: Tom Schmidt and Perran Ross At PEARG, we have a great interest in environmental pests and how to deal with them. One …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/04/30/collecting-fresh-mosquitoes-pearg-in-the-field

  9. The Wolbachia pandemic | Symbionts spread rapidly across highly diverged flies

    Photo by Dr Andrew Weeks CC BY-SA 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

    Words: Perran Ross Cover photo: Andrew Weeks Wolbachia are perhaps the most prevalent bacterial symbionts on earth. Of the millions of insect species, Wolbachia are estimated …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/04/16/the-wolbachia-pandemic-symbionts-spread-rapidly-across-highly-diverged-flies

  10. WOLBACHIA BACTERIA IN ACTION | How we’re using naturally occurring bacteria to stop mosquitoes from spreading disease

    Words and images: Perran Ross Cover photo: Jason Axford Dengue is a major global health issue. It infects millions of people every year and can cause …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/04/13/wolbachia-bacteria-in-action-how-were-using-naturally-occurring-bacteria-to-stop-mosquitoes-from-spreading-disease

Number of posts found: 12