Tag: evolution

  1. Releases of Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes for disease control

    Words and images: Perran Ross When animals raised in captivity are released back into the wild, you might picture cute and furry mammals from an endangered species. But in many countries around the world, people are releasing mosquitoes raised in laboratories into the environment. These mosquitoes feed on human blood and are vectors of dengue, […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2019/09/18/releases-of-wolbachia-infected-mosquitoes-for-disease-control

  2. Using genomics to determine the adaptive potential of populations

    Words: Ary Hoffmann One of the central tenets of conservation biology is that high levels of genetic variation in natural populations is important for their long-term survival. High levels of variation allow populations to adapt to changing environments through evolution. This process is now recognised as being extremely fast when selection pressures are high. In […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2019/06/27/using-genomics-to-determine-the-adaptive-potential-of-populations

  3. New open access paper: Morphological and molecular analysis of Australian earwigs (Dermaptera) points to unique species and regional endemism in the Anisolabididae family

    Words and images: Oliver Stuart Link to open access paper Earwigs (Dermaptera) are a challenging group of insects to study. In Australia, earwigs are variously known as pests, predators of pests (so, beneficial insects), or both at once depending on the crop type and other particulars. The invasive Forficula auricularia (the European earwig) is the […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2019/03/15/new-open-access-paper-morphological-and-molecular-analysis-of-australian-earwigs-dermaptera-points-to-unique-species-and-regional-endemism-in-the-anisolabididae-family

  4. The diversity of Aussie grasshoppers | Part one

    Words: Vanessa White Images: Mike Kearney and Vanessa White Why Australian grasshoppers are fantastic research subjects: The Morabine grasshoppers (subfamily Morabinae) commonly known as “matchstick grasshoppers” are endemic to Australia and comprise 40 genera and around 250 species (Rentz 1996). Both sexes are wingless with a characteristic matchstick-like appearance. Some Morabine species have been studied […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/10/08/the-diversity-of-aussie-grasshoppers-part-one

  5. SEEKING MSc STUDENT | Buruli Ulcer’s Most Wanted – Understanding the mosquito associated with the flesh-eating bacteria, Mycobacterium ulcerans

    Aedes notoscriptus has been identified in association with the emerging bacterial pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans, which causes Buruli ulcer, as well as being a vector of Ross River virus. Key ecological features such as bloodmeal feeding patterns and movement dynamics of individuals are however not clearly defined. This project will involve both laboratory and field-based components. Field […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/10/03/seeking-msc-student-buruli-ulcers-most-wanted-understanding-the-mosquito-associated-with-the-flesh-eating-bacteria-mycobacterium-ulcerans

  6. A new and unusual Wolbachia bacteria from Drosophila flies limited to the female sex

    Words: Ary Hoffmann Cover image: Perran Ross As Wolbachia bacteria that live inside insect cells continue to be discovered and studied in detail, our appreciation of the diverse ways in which these bacteria interact with their hosts continues to expand. In past work we have found Wolbachia that cause embryo death when infected males mate […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/08/24/a-new-and-unusual-wolbachia-bacteria-from-drosophila-flies-limited-to-the-female-sex

  7. Rapid evolution in insect pest species

    Off the back of a review Ary wrote last year in Current Opinion in Insect Science, a less technical and more digestible summary is now available (sans pay-wall) at Science Trends. A Quote from the Science Trends article to grab your interest: Evolutionary changes often occur when pest species invade new areas where they have […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/04/30/rapid-evolution-in-insect-pest-species

  8. The Wolbachia pandemic | Symbionts spread rapidly across highly diverged flies

    Words: Perran Ross Cover photo: Andrew Weeks Wolbachia are perhaps the most prevalent bacterial symbionts on earth. Of the millions of insect species, Wolbachia are estimated to infect up to half of them. These bacteria are renowned for the effects they exert on their hosts, which can often be quite dramatic. Some Wolbachia strains are […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/04/16/the-wolbachia-pandemic-symbionts-spread-rapidly-across-highly-diverged-flies

  9. Study Shows Rapid Evolution in Lab-Reared Insects | Perran and Ary’s new paper covered in Entomology Today

    Perran and Ary’s lab adaptation review  paper is fresh off the press and immediately generating interest. Follow the link below to Entomology Today to read all about it. Study Shows Rapid Evolution in Lab-Reared Insects

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/03/02/study-shows-rapid-evolution-in-lab-reared-insects-perran-and-arys-new-paper-covered-in-entomology-today

  10. Fresh publications!

    Climate contributes to the evolution of pesticide resistance | James Maino, Paul Umina, Ary Hoffmann     Abstract The evolution of pesticide resistance through space and time is of great economic significance to modern agricultural production systems, and consequently, is often well documented. It can thus be used to dissect the evolutionary and ecological processes […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/02/19/fresh-publications

Number of posts found: 20