Tag: wolbachia

  1. MSc projects 2020 – Students wanted

    We are seeking motivated MSc students to apply for several projects starting next year. Enquiries via pearg-queries@unimelb.edu.au Project 1/4: Exploring bacterial symbionts for agricultural pest control PEARG is researching ways to control important agricultural pests such as aphids and mites that cause millions of dollars in damage to crops each year in Australia. This project […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2019/06/14/msc-projects-2020-students-wanted

  2. Sterile mosquito release leads to 80% population knock-down in Singapore

    The National Environment Agency of Singapore released Wolbachia infected male mosquitoes last April in order to suppress the local population. The field study has been a fantastic success with an 80% population reduction achieved in the last nine months. Ary is a member of Singapore’s Dengue Expert Advisory Programme, providing expertise and guidance for the […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2019/02/06/sterile-mosquito-release-leads-to-80-population-knock-down-in-singapore

  3. Marking mosquitoes

    Words: Mengjia Liu Images: Perran Ross and Mengjia Liu It is important to study the fitness of different colonies of Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes, and also of interest to test fitness effects within the same colony when mosquitoes are maintained under different conditions. As we have been maintaining uninfected mosquitoes under laboratory conditions for over 25 generations, […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/10/05/marking-mosquitoes

  4. A new and unusual Wolbachia bacteria from Drosophila flies limited to the female sex

    Words: Ary Hoffmann Cover image: Perran Ross As Wolbachia bacteria that live inside insect cells continue to be discovered and studied in detail, our appreciation of the diverse ways in which these bacteria interact with their hosts continues to expand. In past work we have found Wolbachia that cause embryo death when infected males mate […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/08/24/a-new-and-unusual-wolbachia-bacteria-from-drosophila-flies-limited-to-the-female-sex

  5. Probing the void for blood

    Words and video: Perran Ross I recently filmed one of our mosquito colonies trying desperately to reach my arm through their enclosure. The video has been posted on Reddit by a third party and received enormous attention with over 4.5 million views in its first nine hours. To make the video, I held my arm […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/07/10/probing-the-void-for-blood

  6. New publication | Fine-scale landscape genomics helps explain the slow spatial spread of Wolbachia through the Aedes aegypti population in Cairns, Australia

    Author summary and figures by Tom Schmidt Wolbachia is a bacterium that suppresses the capacity for arbovirus transmission in the mosquito Aedes aegypti, and can spread spatially through wild mosquito populations following local introductions. Recent introductions in Cairns, Australia have successfully established Wolbachia in the Ae. aegypti population, but the infection has spread more slowly than expected […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/05/25/new-publication-fine-scale-landscape-genomics-helps-explain-the-slow-spatial-spread-of-wolbachia-through-the-aedes-aegypti-population-in-cairns-australia

  7. Collecting fresh mosquitoes | PEARG in the field

    Words: Tom Schmidt Photos: Tom Schmidt and Perran Ross At PEARG, we have a great interest in environmental pests and how to deal with them. One of these pests is the mosquito Aedes aegypti, which causes catastrophic damage throughout the world’s tropical zone. Aedes aegypti spreads viruses such as dengue, Zika and chikungunya, and is […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/04/30/collecting-fresh-mosquitoes-pearg-in-the-field

  8. The Wolbachia pandemic | Symbionts spread rapidly across highly diverged flies

    Words: Perran Ross Cover photo: Andrew Weeks Wolbachia are perhaps the most prevalent bacterial symbionts on earth. Of the millions of insect species, Wolbachia are estimated to infect up to half of them. These bacteria are renowned for the effects they exert on their hosts, which can often be quite dramatic. Some Wolbachia strains are […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/04/16/the-wolbachia-pandemic-symbionts-spread-rapidly-across-highly-diverged-flies

  9. WOLBACHIA BACTERIA IN ACTION | How we’re using naturally occurring bacteria to stop mosquitoes from spreading disease

    Words and images: Perran Ross Cover photo: Jason Axford Dengue is a major global health issue. It infects millions of people every year and can cause debilitating illness, inflicting joint pain, rash and fever. Without any effective vaccine, the best way to prevent dengue is to target the mosquitoes that transmit it. Dengue is spread […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/04/13/wolbachia-bacteria-in-action-how-were-using-naturally-occurring-bacteria-to-stop-mosquitoes-from-spreading-disease

  10. New review | The detection and significance of emerging insecticide resistance in mosquitoes

    Nancy, Andrew and Ary have a fresh review article in CSIRO’s ‘Microbiology Australia’ journal. Below is the abstract, for the full text please follow this link. Mosquito-borne arboviruses are increasing in incidence around the world. Australia enjoys some protection from pests and diseases afforded by its geographic isolation coupled with strict biosecurity control at its […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/04/11/new-review-the-detection-and-significance-of-emerging-insecticide-resistance-in-mosquitoes

Number of posts found: 22