Researcher@Library Blog

Sourcing and sharing photos on Wikimedia Commons

Wednesday 24 October 2018, 12:00pm – 1:00pm. Dulcie Hollyock room, Baillieu Library.

Wikimedia Commons is an online repository of free-use images, sounds, and other media files. Wikimedia Commons is free. Everyone is allowed to copy, use and modify any files here freely as long as they follow the terms specified by the author; this often means crediting the source and author(s) appropriately and releasing copies/improvements under the same freedom to others.

In this workshop, Wikimedia experts will discuss sourcing free-to-use photos and guide you through the process of uploading your photos* to WikiCommons from your computer or via a phone/tablet app. Bring some photos that you wish to share with the world!

BYO: laptop, cables, or anything you need to upload your photos from computer/phone/tablet to Wikimedia Commons. 

*For photos of recognisable faces/people please ensure that you have the subjects’ consent to publish their images on WikiCommons. See the WikiCommons’ Photographs of identifiable people guidelines. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Commons:Photographs_of_identifiable_people

Click here to register now

 

For the full list of events during Open Access Week, click here for more information


2018 Rare Book Lecture: Vulnerable Law Sources, and How to Take Care of Them

Vulnerable Law Sources, and How to Take Care of Them

Thursday 25 October 2018, 6.30pm – 7.30pm. Theatre G08, Ground Floor, Melbourne Law School, 185 Pelham Street, Carlton.

Presenter: Associate Professor Ann Genovese (Melbourne Law School)

The description of legal books as ‘rare’ invokes a sense of romance: the preservation of fragments of previous centuries, in specialist archives and libraries, awaiting discovery by the assiduous scholar. Ann’s work concerns telling Australian law stories of the past 60 years, and her archival adventures have been far less romantic, but raise urgent problems. In a time of open access the notes, books, documents, records, court files, and transcripts created closest to our own time should exist in robust proliferation, and enable myriad stories to be told about developments in our law and public life. The reality is that they might be better described as precarious, or vulnerable. Many are of uncertain status or dispersed location; others have already been sentenced.

In her talk Ann will reflect on two recent projects, ‘Lives Lived with Law’ and the ‘Court as Archive’, as both anchor around how Australian public institutions might understand their custodial responsibilities for contemporary law sources. In doing so, she will also contemplate her own scholarly obligations when conducting such research, and why it is she cares about these rich and irreplaceable materials, and the diverse Australian stories of living with law that they tell.

Register Here


BONUS+ Renewals

BONUS+ books will now be able to be renewed twice. From October 16, the number of times you may renew BONUS+ books will increase from one renewal to two renewals. Each renewal period is 21 days. If you need to renew your BONUS+ book, simply renew as you would your normal library books.

More information about renewals: https://library.unimelb.edu.au/borrowing/information/renewing


Open Access Week (22-26 October 2018)

The theme of this week’s Open Access week is ‘Designing equitable foundations for open knowledge’. Open access makes research available to be used by anyone and everyone with an internet connection, not just those with the money, resources, or connections to the most prestigious academic institutions. 

 

Paywall: The Business of Scholarship

Friday 26 October 2018, 1:00 pm – 3:00pm. Melbourne School of Design. 

To celebrate Open Access Week 2018, join us for a screening of the new documentary film, Paywall: The Business of Scholarship, followed by a lively panel discussion. Panel members include: 

  • Professor Ginny Barbour, Director of the Australasian Open Access Strategy Group (AOASG) 
  • Sarah Blatchford, Regional Director, Routledge/Taylor and Francis, and member of Board of Directors, Council for Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences (CHASS) 
  • Associate Professor Fiona Fidler, ARC Future Fellow, Ambassador for the Centre for Open Science (COS), and University of Melbourne researcher working in the areas of reproducibility, transparency and open science 
  • Professor Syun Tutiya, National Institution for Academic Degrees and Quality Enhancement of Higher Education (NIAD-QE), Japan 

Popcorn and choctops provided. 

 

Workshop: Public Access and Your Thesis

Thursday 25 October 2018, 10:00 am – 11:00 am. Baillieu Library 

This session provides an overview of university policy and systems relevant to all students required to deposit their thesis in Minerva Access. It also includes a discussion of relevant university systems, the pros and cons of making your thesis open access, choosing an embargo period, and an overview of how to manage third party copyright materials in your thesis.  This workshop is relevant to all PhD and Masters by research students, and their supervisors. 

To read more and register for events, click here


Paywall: The Business of Scholarship

Interested in learning more about academic publishing, open science, and open access?

Join us for a screening of the new documentary film, Paywall: The Business of Scholarship, followed by a panel discussion about the film and the future of academic publishing, to celebrate Open Access Week 2018.

About the film:

Featuring interviews with representatives from The Royal Society, Springer Nature, The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Wikipedia, Creative Commons, Sci-Hub and researchers from around the world, Paywall: The Business of Scholarship questions the rationale behind the $25.2 billion a year for-profit academic publishing industry and demonstrates a clear need for increased access to research and knowledge.

About the panel:

 The panel will include:

  • Professor Ginny Barbour, Director of the Australasian Open Access Strategy Group (AOASG)
  • Sarah Blatchford, Regional Director, Routledge/Taylor and Francis, and member of Board of Directors, Council for Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences (CHASS)
  • Associate Professor Fiona Fidler, ARC Future Fellow, Ambassador for the Centre for Open Science (COS), and University of Melbourne researcher working in the areas of reproducibility, transparency and open science

The important details:

  • Time: Friday, 26th October, 1-3pm
  • Location: Singapore Theatre, Melbourne School of Design
  • Audience: All staff, students and wider members of the community are welcome.
  • Catering: popcorn and choc-tops will be served

Bookings are essential. Reserve your ticket online via Eventbrite now.


ANDI Early Career workshop (Wed 24 October 2018)

Are you an Early Career Researcher keen to put your research in a bigger perspective and to think beyond your discipline? If so, ANDI wants to hear from you!

The Australian National Development Index (ANDI) project are hosting a workshop to foster ECR engagement with the project. The workshop aims to brief Early Career Researchers (ECRs) on the project, and seek their comments on and responses to it. Most importantly, the ANDI team seeks ECRs’ views about how they might engage with the project, which offers exciting possibilities.

The ANDI project is part of a wider global movement for progress ‘beyond GDP’. By measuring progress against clearly defined goals supported by the community, ANDI is intended as both a national policy and planning tool, helping to define and measure our national vision, and a process to strengthen Australian democracy. In a truly interdisciplinary initiative, ANDI will develop a new, ongoing index of Australia’s progress, wellbeing and sustainability across 12 ‘domains’ covering all key areas of Australian society – economic, social, cultural, environmental and democratic.

Watch the ANDI Project video: https://vimeo.com/292050516/bfb378399c

The Workshop is an opportunity for ECRs to provide feedback on how they think the project should be developed over the next five years, so as to widen the career opportunities for young researchers and support their capacity to work collaboratively. In particular, we want to examine the possibilities for collaborative research applications and for an ‘Australian Progress Fellows’ program that might be funded through scholarships or grants.

The workshop will be held on Wednesday 24 October, 10.00am – 1.00pm

If you would like to be involved, please express your interest by emailing Claudia Sandoval (sandoval@unimelb.edu.au) by Friday 12 October. Please list your faculty and briefly list your research interests (1 – 2 sentences max) in the email.

 

 

 


2018 Melbourne Digital Humanities Pathways Forum

You’re invited to the 2018 Melbourne Digital Humanities Pathways Forum to be held in the Digital Studio, Arts West on Friday 12th October.

The forum is an opportunity for Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences (HASS) scholars and collecting sector (galleries, libraries, archives and museums) professionals to find out about contemporary data and technology-intensive research and collection practices.

Presented by Tinker, tailored research tools for the HASS community, a product of the HASS DEVL Project, the DH Pathways Forum will bring together researchers and professionals to speak about the links between research, data, and national infrastructure.

Register at https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/melbourne-digital-humanities-pathways-forum-2018-your-pathway-to-the-latest-innovative-eresearch-tickets-48824271711?aff=estw


Call for proposals – Digital Literacy Show and Tell event

Image by kaboompics via pixabay (CC0)

Be part of the Digital Literacy Show and Tell, hosted by Scholarly Services – Library, and Melbourne Graduate School of Education on the 12th November, 1:30pm – 3.40pm, in the studioFive learning space, Kwong Lee Dow building.

We are calling for ‘demonstrators’ from across the University to share practical examples of incorporating digital technologies and developing students’ digital literacy skills through teaching. Interested in demonstrating an example from your teaching? Learn more and submit a proposal http://go.unimelb.edu.au/syw6 by Monday 15th October. Submissions will be reviewed for relevance. Attendees will move to the demonstrations stands, asking questions, exploring challenges and making connections.  


Establishing a national research community

MGSE Open Access, Data Sharing and Archiving of Qualitative Research workshop photoOn 9 August 2018, the Social Transformations and Education Research Hub at Melbourne Graduate School of Education (MGSE) hosted a workshop on Open Access, Data Sharing and Archiving of Qualitative Research. Held in conjunction with the Australian Data Archive (ADA) and the Social and Cultural Informatics Platform (SCIP), the workshop brought together almost sixty HASS researchers from around Australia to discuss ideas, interests and dilemmas regarding qualitative research sharing and archiving in the humanities and social sciences, particularly in interdisciplinary studies of childhood, youth and education.

Papers spanned a wide variety of intersecting subject matters and research projects but also presented distinct strands of work – spanning policy, research and cultural sectors – that are part of the changing context in which we conduct and communicate our research. The program addressed several main themes, including: The Big Picture: Policy, Practices, Pitfalls; Archiving the Present: Qualitative and Mixed-methods Projects in the Sociology of Youth and Childhood; Historical Sensibilities and Archival Practices: What can be Learnt from Other Disciplinary Traditions and Cultural Practices?; and Exemplars and Ethics: What’s Working and Not Working? Papers provoked animated discussion surrounding the creative, ethical, practical, methodological and regulatory dimensions of the archiving, re-use and sharing of qualitative research data in the humanities field.

Following this workshop, a small group met the next day to consider how we might further develop collaborations, demonstrator projects and a community of research practice in this area. There were two main lines of discussion. One was exploring the processes, exemplars and practices for digital archiving of qualitative projects. The second was fostering a research community to support a website which will discuss research, showcase programs and projects, link to individual project websites, and provide a portal to an archival repository for sociology of youth and education projects, broadly conceived. The ADA, along with MGSE and SCIP has been developing a prototype of the website and repository and demonstrated them for attendants on the day to garner feedback. The discussions provided an excellent basis for developing this work further. Over the coming months work will continue on the site and a core working group, drawn from researchers Australia-wide, formed from to assist in its development. The current working title for this community is SOCEY- Studies of Childhood, Education and Youth

If you are interested in linking your project to the developing website and repository, or simply finding out more about what is involved, please touch base with us at makingfutures.net or via the ADA or SCIP.

The workshop was supported by AARE Sociology of Education SIG, the ARC, Australian Data Archive, SCIP and MGSE.


Monkeemania in Australia (1st August – 31st January 2019)

Image by skeeze via pixabay

It’s probably a lot better than you think!

In “Monkees music: It’s probably a lot better than you think!”, Dr. Derham Groves, the curator of Monkeemania in Australia, an exhibition currently showing at the Baillieu Library, will focus on the music by the mid-1960s American rock and roll band The Monkees (1966—present), as well as looking at an eclectic mix of other bands and performers of the era, including The Beatles (1960—70), Bobby Goldsboro (b. 1941), Linda Ronstadt & The Stone Poneys (1965—68), Richard Harris (1930—2002), and The Archies (1968—73). Because The Monkees were put together artificially so to speak for a TV series, instead of forming organically like a garage band was supposed to in the 1960s, many people played down the band’s musicianship and songbook from the beginning, even though The Monkees produced smash hits like “Last train to Clarksville” (1966), “[Hey, hey, we’re] The Monkees” (1966), “I’m a believer” (1967), and “Daydream believer” (1967). The fierce running battle over control of The Monkees’ musical output between the band itself, led by Mike Nesmith (b. 1942), and the band’s musical director Don Kirshner (1934—2011), who was known in the musical industry as “the man with the golden ear”, didn’t help the situation either. However, looking back 50 years to when The Monkees first toured Australia in 1968, it is now much easier to assess the merits of the band and its music and also to appreciate just how emblematic The Monkees were of the 1960s.

Monkeemania in Australia

Monkeemania in Australia celebrates the 50th anniversary of the Australian tour by the American band, The Monkees, in 1968.

More broadly, it also provides a snapshot of everyday life in Australia at a very eventful time in history. 1968 was a roller coaster of a year, as a series of tumultuous events—including assassinations, heroic victories in sports, a bloody war, the publication of Myra Brekinridge, a devastating famine, and the premiere of 2001: A Space Odyssey—caused people to celebrate one day and despair the next. Monkeemania in Australia consists of an exhibition and a series of public talks by the exhibition’s curator, Dr Derham Groves, about The Monkees, their Australian tour, their eponymous TV show, their music, and their film Head (1968), a surreal masterpiece. The exhibition is on the ground and third floors of the Baillieu Library, University of Melbourne, while the talks take place in the Dulcie Hollyock Room on the ground floor of the library. The exhibition runs from 1 August 2018 to 31 January 2019.

Public Programs 

Time: 12- 1pm
Location: Dulcie Hollyock room, ground level, Baillieu library, Parkville

Wednesday 3 October
Monkees music 
It’s probably a lot better than you think!

In “Monkees music: It’s probably a lot better than you think!”, Dr. Derham Groves, the curator of Monkeemania in Australia, an exhibition currently showing at the Baillieu Library, will focus on the music by the mid-1960s American rock and roll band The Monkees (1966—present), as well as looking at an eclectic mix of other bands and performers of the era, including The Beatles (1960—70), Bobby Goldsboro (b. 1941), Linda Ronstadt & The Stone Poneys (1965—68), Richard Harris (1930—2002), and The Archies (1968—73). Because The Monkees were put together artificially so to speak for a TV series, instead of forming organically like a garage band was supposed to in the 1960s, many people played down the band’s musicianship and songbook from the beginning, even though The Monkees produced smash hits like “Last train to Clarksville” (1966), “[Hey, hey, we’re] The Monkees” (1966), “I’m a believer” (1967), and “Daydream believer” (1967). The fierce running battle over control of The Monkees’ musical output between the band itself, led by Mike Nesmith (b. 1942), and the band’s musical director Don Kirshner (1934—2011), who was known in the musical industry as “the man with the golden ear”, didn’t help the situation either. However, looking back 50 years to when The Monkees first toured Australia in 1968, it is now much easier to assess the merits of the band and its music and also to appreciate just how emblematic The Monkees were of the 1960s.

Click here to register now

Wednesday 7 November
1968: The year of the Monkees  
Putting the Monkees’ tour of Australia into context.

In “1968: The year of The Monkees”, Dr. Derham Groves will review some world events from 1968, the same year the American pop band The Monkees toured Australia. According to the author of 1968: The Year that Rocked the World (2005), Mark Kurlansky: ‘There has never been a year like 1968, and it is unlikely that there will ever be one again’. It was certainly a roller coaster of a year, as a series of tumultuous events made people celebrate one day and despair the next. On the plus side for example, NASA was quickly working towards a moon landing; inspiring things happened in the world of sports including Australian victories by Ralph Doubell (b. 1945) on the running track, Rod Laver (b. 1938) on the tennis court, Lionel Rose (1948–2011) in the boxing ring and Rain Lover (1964–1989) on the racetrack; the publication of some influential books including Myra Breckinridge by Gore Vidal (1925–2012) and The Margaret Fulton Cookbook by Margaret Fulton (b. 1924); the release of some groundbreaking films such as 2001: A Space Odyssey and Planet of the Apes; and the debut of Julia (1968–71), an American TV sitcom about a black nurse starring Diahann Caroll (b. 1935). While on the down side, there was fierce fighting in Vietnam; the senseless murders of American civil rights campaigner Dr Martin Luther King Jr and US Senator Robert Kennedy (1925–1968) in the USA, a devastating famine in Biafra; and the end of a brief move towards democracy in Czechoslovakia. Dr. Groves’ talk will put The Monkees’ tour of Australia in 1968 into a wider cultural, political and social context.

Click here to register now

Wednesday 28 November 
The Movie, Head (1968)
The screening of the Monkees’ surreal masterpiece

Click here to register now


Number of posts found: 417

Subscribe to Researcher@Library

For frequent updates from our blog, sign up to our email list to never miss a post.

Categories

Archives