Posted under News

  1. Sport, Community and Everyday Life: World War One and COVID-19 Compared

    For many Australians, the economic pain brought by the COVID-19 crisis has been compounded by the disruption caused to sporting activities. For football-loving Melburnians, the very …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/shaps-research/2020/07/31/sport-community-everyday-life

  2. Celebrating Our Students’ Achievements

    Each year we see our students achieve remarkable feats, and this year – despite being unusual due to a global pandemic that leaves us working and …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/shaps-research/2020/07/27/celebrating-our-students-achievements

  3. How to Keep Minorities Out of Philosophy

    Academic philosophy faces numerous challenges in the current climate. One of its ongoing problems is the systemic barriers in place in the discipline for minority students. …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/shaps-research/2020/07/24/how-to-keep-minorities-out-of-philosophy

  4. Hagia Sophia Reigns Serene

    Istanbul’s 1,500 year-old Hagia Sophia has a tumultuous history and its return to being a mosque is only the latest twist for a building that has …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/shaps-research/2020/07/23/hagia-sophia-reigns-serene

  5. What Today’s News Has in Common with Early Execution Ballads

    Violence, corruption and murder dominate our modern headlines, but little has changed since execution ballads were sung in sixteenth-century Europe. In this article, republished from Pursuit, …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/shaps-research/2020/07/20/what-todays-news-has-in-common-with-early-execution-ballads

  6. Confronting the History of Race and Empathy in the Classroom: A Conversation with Dr Sarah Walsh

    In June 2020, Dr Sarah Walsh joined the History Program as our new Hansen Lecturer in Global History. In this new podcast, in conversation with History PhD candidate Amy Hodgson, Dr Walsh discusses her research, and her approach to teaching. The interview traverses a wide range of topics, including the challenges posed by online teaching, especially when it comes to handling difficult and confronting histories of oppression and violence. What approaches can be used to foster empathy and kindness in the classroom? What methods can researchers working on these topics use in order to take care of their own mental health and wellbeing? And what are some useful starting points for people who want to educate themselves about issues around race and racism?

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/shaps-research/2020/07/17/confronting-the-history-of-race-and-empathy-in-the-classroom-a-conversation-with-dr-sarah-walsh

  7. Remembering Ding Dyason: Bringing Humanities and Science Together

    Last year marked one hundred years since the birth of Diana ‘Ding’ Dyason (1919–1989), historian of medicine and former head of History and Philosophy of Science …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/shaps-research/2020/07/13/remembering-ding-dyason-bringing-humanities-and-science-together

  8. Australia’s Earliest European-built Boat?

    The Barangaroo Boat, as it has come to be known, was discovered in November 2018 during development works conducted by Sydney Metro. After completing her MA …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/shaps-research/2020/07/10/australias-earliest-european-built-boat

  9. SHAPS Digest (June 2020)

    A monthly round-up of media commentary, publications and projects, and other news from across the School community.

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/shaps-research/2020/07/09/shaps-digest-june-2020

  10. Episode 5 in the SHAPS Podcast Series: Professor Peter McPhee

    Societies have always used statues and other monuments as ways of recognising power and eminence. In Australia, as in many other places, there is currently public debate over whether some statues should be removed, who should make the decision, and what should be the fate of the statues themselves. Should they be displayed with explanatory plaques, taken away to be preserved in museums or simply removed? Such debates are common in history. In this episode, Professor Peter McPhee surveys the wide range of objects destroyed during the French Revolution – from buildings and statues to books and paintings – but also the remarkable responses of revolutionary governments. It concludes with some reflections about the place of monumental statues and heritage sites in Australia.

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/shaps-research/2020/07/06/disaster-change-5

Number of posts found: 108