SOTEL

Melbourne CSHE Scholarship of Technology Enhanced Learning research network

Introducing Elisa Bone

Elisa is a Senior Lecturer in Higher Education Curriculum and Assessment – STEM, at the Melbourne Centre for the Study of Higher Education, where she works primarily within the FlexAP program advising academics across the University in curriculum innovation projects.

Elisa has a diverse background, with a PhD in Zoology from the University of Melbourne and experience as a production editor at CSIRO Publishing. She has worked as an instructor and researcher in the biological and ecological sciences in Australia, New Zealand and at Columbia University in the United States, as well as in education strategy at the University of Sydney. During her time in the US, she co-led a collaborative project to develop habitat assessment protocols for urban shorelines such as NY Harbor and was a senior consultant on the NSF-funded Billion Oyster Project Curriculum and Community Enterprise for Restoration Science (www.stemccers.com). Through this work, she gained a deep interest in using collaborative education projects to improve environmental literacy and awareness of global environmental problems, and worked with partners in the BOP project to build digital tools for shoreline biodiversity assessments.

Motivated to establish a related project in Australia, where we face similar problems with shoreline degradation, Elisa worked with local community groups and schools and built a mobile app – YourShore – in collaboration with the FAIMS group at Macquarie University that was initially slated for citizen scientists. With colleagues at Hong Kong University, the University of Johannesburg and the University of Melbourne, she has been adapting YourShore to the higher education context, with the goal to include it within a proposed digital learning ecosystem for upper undergraduate students in marine and coastal ecology at each institution.

But these projects can be difficult to get off the ground and her work to date has been as much about partnerships as it is about technology and pedagogy. To explore these ideas further, and incorporating ideas from systems thinking, risk matrices and change management, she is currently developing a predictive framework for elearning project success. More updates coming soon!

Recent related outputs:

Bone, E.K., Greenfield, R. Williams, G.A. & Russell, B.D. (2020). Creating a digital learning ecosystem to facilitate authentic place-based learning and international collaboration – a coastal case study. Concise paper: ASCILITE 2020 Conference Proceedings. Draft available at https://2020conference.ascilite.org/program/

O’Neil, J. M., Newton, R. J., Birney, L. B, Bone, E. K., Green, A. E., Merrick, B, Goodwin-Segal, T., Moore, G., Fraoli, A., Dennison, W.C. (2020). Using urban harbors for experiential, environmental literacy: Case studies of New York and Chesapeake Bay. Regional Studies in Marine Science 33: 100886. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rsma.2019.100886

O’Neil, J.M., Taillie, D., Walsh, B., Dennison, W.C., Bone, E.K., Reid, D.J., Newton, R., Strayer, D.L., Boicourt, K., Birney, L.B., Janis, S., Malinowski, P. and Fisher, M. (2016). New York Harbor: Resilience in the face of four centuries of development. Regional Studies in Marine Science 8(2): 274–286. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rsma.2016.06.004

Reid, D. J., Bone, E. K., Thurman, M. A., Levinton, J. D., Newton, R. and Strayer, D. L. (2015). Development of protocols to assess the relative habitat values of urban shorelines in the New York–New Jersey Harbor Estuary. Report to the Hudson River Foundation, New York, NY, USA. Available at: http://www.harborestuary.org/aboutestuary-habitats-shorelines.html

Reid, D. J., Bone, E. K., Thurman, M. A., Levinton, J. D., Newton, R. and Strayer, D. L. (2015). Preliminary protocols for assessing habitat values of urban estuarine shorelines using colonization devices. Report to the Hudson River Foundation, New York, NY, USA. Available at: http://www.harborestuary.org/aboutestuary-habitats-shorelines.html


Digital Campus Forum Keynote: Preparing For The Future – Rethinking The Education Delivery Model

Associate Professor Thomas Cochrane from MCSHE was recently one of the keynote speakers for the 4th annual Digital Campus: Remote Teaching, Online Blended Learning & Education Continuity Planning Forum, 29-31 March 2021 organised by Clariden Global

http://claridenglobal.com/conference/digital-campus-au/agenda/

The presentation was titled:

Preparing For The Future: Rethinking The Education Delivery Model

  • How technology is changing the role of the teacher and students’ learning environment
  • How pedagogy will change due to online content delivery and learning
  • How are the experiences and lessons from lockdown will help in the formulation of future education delivery model

Presentation notes are online at http://go.unimelb.edu.au/ro2i 

The presentation featured 2 examples of rethinking education delivery:

  1. The Authentic Mobile Learning Triangle for learning design
  2. The Bionic Limb – collaborative curriculum design in Biomedical Engineering

The Authentic Mobile Learning Triangle

 

The Bionic Limb Activities

The Bionic Limb Project Team.

CGBrochure_L21006_L21007_4th_Digital_Campus_AU_V24


#SOTELNZ Symposium 2021 Abstracts & Presentations from @MelbCSHE

Below is a selection of links to the published Abstracts and video presentations for several presentations from members of MCSHE at the recent SoTEL 2021 Symposium that was fully online. The full programme is available at https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1fmnJI9ce5983R1KuoUhwrRu5mncmmIF1bNfNqQT6JR8/edit?usp=sharing

 

Locke, W. (2021). A Provocation: Blended learning is dead, long live blended learning!. Pacific Journal of Technology Enhanced Learning, 3(1), 1. https://doi.org/10.24135/pjtel.v3i1.105

Video available soon.

 

Lam, L., Cochrane, T., Rajagopal, V., Davey, K., & John, S. (2021). Enhancing student learning through trans-disciplinary project-based assessment in bioengineering. Pacific Journal of Technology Enhanced Learning, 3(1), 4-5. https://doi.org/10.24135/pjtel.v3i1.80

Lam, Lionel; Cochrane, Thomas; RAJAGOPAL, VIJAYARAGHAVAN; DAVEY, CATHERINE; JOHN, SAM; SHAKTIVESH, SHAKTIVESH; et al. (2021): Enhancing student learning through trans-disciplinary project-based assessment in bioengineering. figshare. Media. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.13725631.v1

 

Cochrane, T., Coleman, K., Belton, A., Fitzgerald, E., Glasser, S., Harris, J., Melzack, G., Spreadborough, K., & Mactavish, K. (2021). #DataCreativities: Developing a trans-disciplinary data visualization framework from Arts practice to teaching and learning during COVID19. Pacific Journal of Technology Enhanced Learning, 3(1), 8-10. https://doi.org/10.24135/pjtel.v3i1.84

Cochrane, Thomas; COLEMAN, KATHRYN; Belton, Amanda; Fitzgerald, Emily; GLASSER, SOLANGE; Harris, Dr Julian Owen; et al. (2021): #DataCreativities: Developing a trans-disciplinary data visualization framework from Arts practice to teaching and learning during COVID19. figshare. Media. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.13726870.v1

 

Cochrane, T., Arkoudis, S., & Benevento, C. (2021). Collaborative Online Professional Development Design. Pacific Journal of Technology Enhanced Learning, 3(1), 11-12. https://doi.org/10.24135/pjtel.v3i1.85

Cochrane, Thomas; ARKOUDIS, SOPHIA; BENEVENTO, CATHLEEN (2021): Collaborative Online Professional Development Design. figshare. Media. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.13718725.v1

 

Aguayo, C., Cochrane, T., Aiello, S., & Wilkinson, N. (2021). Enhancing Immersiveness in Paramedicine Education XR Simulation Design. Pacific Journal of Technology Enhanced Learning, 3(1), 39-40. https://doi.org/10.24135/pjtel.v3i1.103

Aguayo, Claudio; Cochrane, Thomas; Aiello, Stephen; Wilkinson, Norm (2021): Enhancing Immersiveness in Paramedicine Education XR Simulation Design. figshare. Journal contribution. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.14055401.v2

 


The importance of sessions in online learning

Members of the Technology Enhanced Learning in Higher Education have examined an important (but often overlooked) aspect of online learning: sessions. Sessions are periods of time that students dedicate to complete several tasks related to their course.

In the paper entitled “The importance and meaning of session behaviour in a MOOC” published at Computers & Education, they found that how students organise their sessions over time – in terms of their length, distribution and content – is related to their use of self-regulated learning skills and to their overall success in the course.

This suggests that thinking of how students will engage with courses in terms of sessions (for example, how can they break activities into smaller tasks?) is an important aspect for teachers and learning designers to consider when making decisions about the structure of their subjects.

More details about the paper below:

One of the main challenges for online learners is knowing how to effectively manage their time. Highly autonomous settings, such as Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), put additional pressure on learners in this regard. However, little is known about how learners organise their time in terms of sessions or blocks of time across a MOOC. This study examined session behavioural data of 9272 learners in a MOOC and its relation to their engagement, grade and self-report data measuring aspects of self-regulated learning (SRL). From an exploratory temporal approach using clustering and group comparison tests, we examined how learners distributed sessions in relation to their length and frequency across the course (macro aspect), and which types of activities they prioritised within these sessions (micro aspect). We then investigated if these patterns of sessions were related to learners’ level of engagement, achievement and use of self-regulated learning (SRL) skills. We found that successful learners had more frequent and longer sessions across the course, mixed up activities within sessions, and changed the focus of activities within sessions across the course. In addition, session distribution was found to be a meaningful proxy for learners’ use of SRL skills related to time management and effort regulation. That is, learners with higher levels of time management and effort regulation had longer and more sessions across the course. Based on the results, implications for supporting specific session behaviours to promote effective learning in MOOCs are discussed.

Highlights:
• We used learning analytics to examine learners’ session behaviour patterns in a MOOC.
• We examined its relationship with engagement, achievement and self-regulated learning (SRL).
• Session distribution and activity were related to levels of engagement and achievement.
• Session distribution was found to be a meaningful proxy for learners’ use of SRL skills.
• Supporting specific session behaviours can potentially promote effective learning in MOOCs.

de Barba, P. G., Malekian, D., Oliveira, E. A., Bailey, J., Ryan, T., & Kennedy, G. (2020). The importance and meaning of session behaviour in a MOOC. Computers & Education, 146. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2019.103772


Episode6 of The New Normal Webinar Series

Join us for Episode6 of @MelbCSHE The New Normal Webinar series https://melbourne-cshe.unimelb.edu.au/resources/teaching-learning-and-assessment/the-new-normal-engaged-teaching-and-learning-webinar-series#episode6 This Friday 1pm AEDT with AAUT winner guest @Macowling & panel @cdeneen212 @briansology @CatManning @SiewFangLaw1 Reimagining Dual Delivery for a place-based University

This webinar series explores ways in which people and institutions are responding to and learning from the current crisis and applying these lessons into learning, teaching, technology and student engagement. The New Normal is a collaboration between Melbourne CSHE and Learning Environments. Panellists will include members of the Melbourne CSHE and Learning Environments teams, with some episodes featuring guest panellists from the University of Melbourne and the international Higher Education community.

Previous episodes:

  • Cochrane, Thomas; Deneen, Christopher; Law, Siew; MANNING, CATHERINE; Martin, Brian (2020): Episode Five: Student Engagement Online Part 2: Surface vs Deep. figshare. Media. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.13370333
  • Cochrane, Thomas; Deneen, Christopher; Law, Siew; MANNING, CATHERINE; Martin, Brian (2020): Episode Four: Student engagement: Meeting current needs and developing sustainable approaches. figshare. Media. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.13339223
  • Cochrane, Thomas; Deneen, Christopher; Law, Siew; MANNING, CATHERINE; Martin, Brian (2020): Episode Three: Myth-busting: Debunking the myths of online learning. figshare. Media. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.13339202
  • Cochrane, Thomas; Deneen, Christopher; Law, Siew; MANNING, CATHERINE; Martin, Brian (2020): Episode Two. From emergency to emergent practice: What we’ve learned about interaction and engagement. figshare. Media. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.13339148
  • Cochrane, Thomas; Deneen, Christopher; Law, Siew; MANNING, CATHERINE (2020): The New Normal Webinar Series: Episode One Online examinations: Challenges, assumptions and best practices. figshare. Media. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.13339157

Join us for the Scholarship of Technology Enhanced Learning Symposium #SOTELNZ tomorrow & Friday

The SoTEL 2021 Symposium is a two-day online virtual event with 6 Trendsetters/Keynotes, and over 20 expert presenters. See the program at https://sotel.nz now live & abstracts published at https://ojs.aut.ac.nz/pjtel/issue/view/5 Presentations include: @4DVirtualFarm https://doi.org/10.24135/pjtel.v3i1.100 @aiello_stephen https://doi.org/10.24135/pjtel.v3i1.89 @kateycoleman https://doi.org/10.24135/pjtel.v3i1.84 Lionel Lam https://doi.org/10.24135/pjtel.v3i1.80

@thomcochrane https://doi.org/10.24135/pjtel.v3i1.85

@caguyaoNZ https://doi.org/10.24135/pjtel.v3i1.103

 


Designing video feedback to support the socioemotional aspects of online learning

A member of the Technology-Enhanced Learning research group at Melbourne CSHE, Tracii Ryan, has authored a new journal article published in Educational Technology Research and Development.

The article, titled ‘Designing video feedback to support the socioemotional aspects of online learning‘ will be part of a forthcoming special issue – Shifting to digital: Informing the rapid development, deployment, and future of teaching and learning. The special issue features articles focused on the emergency shift to online learning caused by COVID19.

In this somewhat unusual special issue, authors were required to produce 500-1000 word responses to articles that had been previously published in Educational Technology Research and Development. The goal of these responses was to highlight how findings from the original article could be used to inform news ideas for flexible learning, online learning, and learning disruption.

Tracii’s article responds a 2015 paper by Borup, West and Thomas, titled, The impact of text versus video communication on instructor feedback in blended courses. Essentially, the response suggests that the provision of video feedback can support positive socioemotional outcomes in learners. It also highlights three design considerations for educators to consider when designing video feedback for online learners: content, timing and personalisation.

The abstract and citation for the new article are presented below.

The COVID-19 pandemic required instructors to rapidly redesign subject delivery for the online environment. In dealing with this emergency situation, instructors may have focused their energies primarily on transitioning learning and assessment activities to the online context rather than working to support the socioemotional aspects of learning, such as belonging and motivation. As a result, online classes may have lacked social presence, leaving students feeling unvalued and demotivated. Research findings by Borup, West, and Thomas (Educ Technol Res Dev 63(2):161–184, 2015) indicate that instructors may be able to support positive socioemotional outcomes for online students through the provision of video feedback comments. The purpose of this short response is to briefly review the work of Borup et al. (2015) and, in doing so, highlight three key design considerations relating to the creation and provision of video feedback comments in order to bolster socioemotional outcomes for online students. Limitations and implications for future research are also discussed, including cultural and inclusivity issues.

Ryan, T. (2021). Designing video feedback to support the socioemotional aspects of online learning. Educational Technology Research and Development, 1-4. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11423-020-09918-7


Using educational design research to develop authentic learning for Graduate Entry Nursing students

This paper describes using an educational design-based methodology to evaluate authentic learning environments for Graduate Entry Nursing (GEN) students. While developing this new GEN program in New Zealand, two specific challenges arose: how to design and deliver a condensed and intensive program that met healthcare sector requirements, while ensuring the content met the needs of the typical GEN student. To meet these challenges the authors used educational design research (EDR) as a reflective and iterative approach to develop and adapt the teaching and learning strategies, content, and delivery. EDR involves four phases: exploration and analysis of the issues, design of a prototype intervention, reflection and evaluation, followed by iterative redesign and re-evaluation; this paper reports on Phase 1 and Phase 2. It is envisaged this paper will provide timely insights for those in the process of developing or refining graduate entry programs in Australasia.

Macdiarmid, R., Winnington, R., Cochrane, T., & Merrick, E. (2021, 2021/01/07/). Using educational design research to develop authentic learning for Graduate Entry Nursing students in New Zealand. Nurse Education in Practice, 102965. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nepr.2021.102965 


Hybrid pedagogies for pre- and in-service practice-based teacher education 2021: Covid-normal

Hybrid pedagogies for pre- and in-service practice-based teacher education 2021: Covid-normal

Kathryn Coleman and Nick J. Archer (studioFive Technician – Visual Arts & Music, MGSE)

What are hybrid pedagogies?

“My hypothesis is that all learning is necessarily hybrid. In classroom-based pedagogy, it is important to engage the digital selves of our students. And, in online pedagogy, it is equally important to engage their physical selves. With digital pedagogy and online education, our challenge is not to merely replace (or offer substitutes for) face-to-face instruction, but to find new and innovative ways to engage students in the practice of learning” (Stommel, 9 March, 2012).

There are some constraints in the current understanding of ‘blended pedagogies’ for the new ’COVID-normal’ physically distanced classroom. Much of the discussion is still focussed on delivery of content, rather than on digital learning experiences and how the learner will engage and participate in a relational space such as a studio, field or lab. The blend or dual mode of teaching signifies a binary, an either or rather than a hybridity of methods, tools and relational pedagogies. We know that educational technology has changed the nature of teaching; even more so as educators gained new skills, knowledge and experience in the design of learning and use of tools such as Canvas, Zoom, Teams and other integrations in these main ecosystems in 2020. These experiences have for many, facilitated new capabilities, and strengthened the connections between online and in-person coursework, but need to be furthered for the new safe ’COVID-normal’ digital classroom to be effective.

There are new affordances that require new metaphors for ‘knowing’ and ‘being’ pedagogies.

Fixed gear ‘town’ bike (analog)

        Multi-speed hybrid ‘off road’ bike (digital)

We use the metaphor for the fixed town bike and the multi-speed hybrid ‘off road’ bike to explore what hybrid pedagogies might allow. We were interested in exploring this because we teach Visual Arts and Design teachers in studioFive, and we are preparing them for the Covid-normal digital studio classroom that they will encounter upon graduation. We want them to be riding multi-speed ‘off road’ bikes, prepared for innovative remote teaching. Now, both bikes are great, but they take you different places; both enable and afford movement, transportation and freedom. They both get you get from one A to B, or one place to another but only one is a hybrid design that allows the rider to shift the gears, and go from the town to the track. The multi-speed hybrid ‘off road’ bike is versatile, agile and transformative.

What might this look like?

  • Teaching remotely with some options for studio-based (and practitioner site-based) learning and teaching
  • Simulated experiences
  • Our own practice as a resource (pre-recorded, recorded on site during dual mode teaching, sustainably re-used and re-purposed)
  • Blended synchronous learning (BSL): “refers to a modality where the same learning activities are experienced by students on-campus and remote students within a single group and at the same time”.
  • Captured and curated in Portfolios such as OneNote Class Notebook in Teams or Padlet
  • Live over table (Live polling, backchannel, and collaborative notetaking in Canvas, collaborative whiteboard spaces such as Miro, drawio, Jamboard)
  • For learning in video (screencast, interactive video, lecture capture, feedback)
  • As demonstration (using video recording devices, allowing you to capture lab, field, outdoor and classroom demonstrations using webcams, document cameras, handheld device etc)
  • Social Interactions for seeing connections and collaborations on site (using Kaltura, YouTube, Vimeo as webcast and livestream, using Canvas Collaboration for Jigsaw activities)
  • In real time (using Zoom, Teams, LivePolling and backchannel for class discussion)
  • Cameras on individual small portable whiteboards/large paper and Post-it notes and markers (participating in group work virtually, if they’re Zooming in using their phone).
  • Hand held devices (phones, ipads, go pro) for capturing images of Post-it notes and notes to a group whiteboard.

Fixed and Unfixed Hybrid Teaching Technologies

There are different educational technologies which can embed themselves into the classroom to aid our teaching across multiple sites including Canvas. This is the first shift to hybrid, seeing teaching as a multi-sited and socially distanced multi-sited learning space.  Depending whether you are onsite or offsite the affordances of the technology required need to be considered as placemaking.

Here, we consider this in terms of fixed and unfixed technology just as the bike metaphor affords. Fixed technology is embedded in the classroom and its use off site is limited to the fact that it is dependent on a constant power source and network (wireless and ethernet). Unfixed technology can be moved either around the classroom and can be easily used off site. Recording is possible but live streaming can be difficult for these devices and they do not integrate well into software such as Zoom.

The potential affordances of hybrid pedagogies enable a shift in how we might teach and learn, assess and evidence in real-situated and digital-online spaces and sites for pre- and in-service practice-based teacher education in the covid-19 normal.

Hybrid pedagogies are speculative, relational, responsive and strategic and designed to focus on the multimodal, material, socio-technical, creative and critical multiliteracies. Hybrid pedagogies consider the intersections of technologies, pedagogies and methodologies to design for new opportunities.

What new and innovative ways are you engaging students in the practice of learning?


Introducing @ToddStretton researcher & practitioner in Physiotherapy Education#MESH360

Todd is currently the Physiotherapy Programme Leader and Faculty Academic Quality and Development Advisor at AUT University, Auckland, New Zealand. In a time of reduced availability of clinical placements, Todd has explored the pedagogical use of Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) into healthcare curricula with a focus on improving critical thinking skills and authentic learning. This has lead to the development of virtual environments specific to physiotherapy, as well as in collaboration with other health professionals . More recently, he has been involved in developing a Virtual Learning Space which would provide opportunity for students to determine and construct their own learning with peers that is situated in virtual healthcare environments.

In 2019, Todd was awarded both the Faculty and Vice Chancellor’s award for Teaching Excellence (Teaching Innovation).

Todd is about to embark on the PhD journey with the aim to investigate Critical Thinking in Healthcare Education through Mobile Extended Reality through education design research.

 

References


Number of posts found: 34