SOTEL

Melbourne CSHE Scholarship of Technology Enhanced Learning research network

#TheNewNormal @MelbCSHE Webinar Episode 7 is now available https://doi.org/10.26188/14633442

#TheNewNormal @MelbCSHE Webinar Episode 7 is now available https://melbourne-cshe.unimelb.edu.au/resources/teaching-learning-and-assessment/the-new-normal-engaged-teaching-and-learning-webinar-series#episode7 @cdeneen212 @SiewFangLaw1 @CatManning @mjhenderson @Briansology https://doi.org/10.26188/14633442

Panellists: Associate Professor Thom Cochrane, Dr Chris Deneen, Dr Siew Fang Law, Ms Catherine Manning and special guest Professor Michael Henderson

Abstract: This episode will feature special guest Professor Michael Henderson from Monash University who will discuss with the panel the impact and best case principles of dual-delivery for face-to-face Universities such as The University of Melbourne and Monash University. As we venture back into on-campus teaching and learning for the second half of 2021 and leverage what we have learnt from the rapid move to online learning – what principles and practices can enhance the face-to-face teaching and learning experience in the future?


#TheNewNormal @MelbCSHE Webinar E7 14th May with @cdeneen212 @thomcochrane @CatManning @SiewFangLaw1 @mjhenderson

Join us for Episode 7 of The New Normal (Teaching and Learning) Webinar Series from @MelbCSHE this Friday 1pm AEST via Zoom (link on series web page).

The impact and best case principles of dual-delivery for face-to-face Universities

Friday 14 May 2021, 1pm AEST
Panellists: Associate Professor Thom Cochrane @thomcochrane Dr Chris Deneen @cdeneen212 Dr Siew Fang Law @SiewFangLaw Ms Catherine Manning @CatManning and special guest Professor Michael Henderson @mjhenderson

Abstract: This episode will feature special guest Professor Michael Henderson from Monash University who will discuss with the panel the impact and best case principles of dual-delivery for face-to-face Universities such as The University of Melbourne and Monash University. As we venture back into on-campus teaching and learning for the second half of 2021 and leverage what we have learnt from the rapid move to online learning – what principles and practices can enhance the face-to-face teaching and learning experience in the future?

 


#SoTEL Showcase #1

The first in the SoTEL Showcase series 2021 featured four best case examples of Technology Enhanced Learning from the University of Melbourne academic community. Recordings of the individual presentations and citation formats are below.

RAJAGOPAL, VIJAYARAGHAVAN; Lam, Lionel (2021): Bionic Limb Project. University of Melbourne. Media. https://doi.org/10.26188/14482167.v1

 

BARBER, STUART (2021): 4DVirtualFarms. University of Melbourne. Media. https://doi.org/10.26188/14482176.v1

 

GLASSER, SOLANGE; OSBORNE, MARGARET (2021): FFAM Virtual Performance Lab. University of Melbourne. Media. https://doi.org/10.26188/14482170.v2

 

BUSKES, GAVIN (2021): Enhancing Online Learning Using Technology. University of Melbourne. Media. https://doi.org/10.26188/14482476.v1


Introducing Elisa Bone

Elisa is a Senior Lecturer in Higher Education Curriculum and Assessment – STEM, at the Melbourne Centre for the Study of Higher Education, where she works primarily within the FlexAP program advising academics across the University in curriculum innovation projects.

Elisa has a diverse background, with a PhD in Zoology from the University of Melbourne and experience as a production editor at CSIRO Publishing. She has worked as an instructor and researcher in the biological and ecological sciences in Australia, New Zealand and at Columbia University in the United States, as well as in education strategy at the University of Sydney. During her time in the US, she co-led a collaborative project to develop habitat assessment protocols for urban shorelines such as NY Harbor and was a senior consultant on the NSF-funded Billion Oyster Project Curriculum and Community Enterprise for Restoration Science (www.stemccers.com). Through this work, she gained a deep interest in using collaborative education projects to improve environmental literacy and awareness of global environmental problems, and worked with partners in the BOP project to build digital tools for shoreline biodiversity assessments.

Motivated to establish a related project in Australia, where we face similar problems with shoreline degradation, Elisa worked with local community groups and schools and built a mobile app – YourShore – in collaboration with the FAIMS group at Macquarie University that was initially slated for citizen scientists. With colleagues at Hong Kong University, the University of Johannesburg and the University of Melbourne, she has been adapting YourShore to the higher education context, with the goal to include it within a proposed digital learning ecosystem for upper undergraduate students in marine and coastal ecology at each institution.

But these projects can be difficult to get off the ground and her work to date has been as much about partnerships as it is about technology and pedagogy. To explore these ideas further, and incorporating ideas from systems thinking, risk matrices and change management, she is currently developing a predictive framework for elearning project success. More updates coming soon!

Recent related outputs:

Bone, E.K., Greenfield, R. Williams, G.A. & Russell, B.D. (2020). Creating a digital learning ecosystem to facilitate authentic place-based learning and international collaboration – a coastal case study. Concise paper: ASCILITE 2020 Conference Proceedings. Draft available at https://2020conference.ascilite.org/program/

O’Neil, J. M., Newton, R. J., Birney, L. B, Bone, E. K., Green, A. E., Merrick, B, Goodwin-Segal, T., Moore, G., Fraoli, A., Dennison, W.C. (2020). Using urban harbors for experiential, environmental literacy: Case studies of New York and Chesapeake Bay. Regional Studies in Marine Science 33: 100886. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rsma.2019.100886

O’Neil, J.M., Taillie, D., Walsh, B., Dennison, W.C., Bone, E.K., Reid, D.J., Newton, R., Strayer, D.L., Boicourt, K., Birney, L.B., Janis, S., Malinowski, P. and Fisher, M. (2016). New York Harbor: Resilience in the face of four centuries of development. Regional Studies in Marine Science 8(2): 274–286. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rsma.2016.06.004

Reid, D. J., Bone, E. K., Thurman, M. A., Levinton, J. D., Newton, R. and Strayer, D. L. (2015). Development of protocols to assess the relative habitat values of urban shorelines in the New York–New Jersey Harbor Estuary. Report to the Hudson River Foundation, New York, NY, USA. Available at: http://www.harborestuary.org/aboutestuary-habitats-shorelines.html

Reid, D. J., Bone, E. K., Thurman, M. A., Levinton, J. D., Newton, R. and Strayer, D. L. (2015). Preliminary protocols for assessing habitat values of urban estuarine shorelines using colonization devices. Report to the Hudson River Foundation, New York, NY, USA. Available at: http://www.harborestuary.org/aboutestuary-habitats-shorelines.html


Digital Campus Forum Keynote: Preparing For The Future – Rethinking The Education Delivery Model

Associate Professor Thomas Cochrane from MCSHE was recently one of the keynote speakers for the 4th annual Digital Campus: Remote Teaching, Online Blended Learning & Education Continuity Planning Forum, 29-31 March 2021 organised by Clariden Global

http://claridenglobal.com/conference/digital-campus-au/agenda/

The presentation was titled:

Preparing For The Future: Rethinking The Education Delivery Model

  • How technology is changing the role of the teacher and students’ learning environment
  • How pedagogy will change due to online content delivery and learning
  • How are the experiences and lessons from lockdown will help in the formulation of future education delivery model

Presentation notes are online at http://go.unimelb.edu.au/ro2i 

The presentation featured 2 examples of rethinking education delivery:

  1. The Authentic Mobile Learning Triangle for learning design
  2. The Bionic Limb – collaborative curriculum design in Biomedical Engineering

The Authentic Mobile Learning Triangle

 

The Bionic Limb Activities

The Bionic Limb Project Team.

CGBrochure_L21006_L21007_4th_Digital_Campus_AU_V24


#SOTELNZ Symposium 2021 Abstracts & Presentations from @MelbCSHE

Below is a selection of links to the published Abstracts and video presentations for several presentations from members of MCSHE at the recent SoTEL 2021 Symposium that was fully online. The full programme is available at https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1fmnJI9ce5983R1KuoUhwrRu5mncmmIF1bNfNqQT6JR8/edit?usp=sharing

 

Locke, W. (2021). A Provocation: Blended learning is dead, long live blended learning!. Pacific Journal of Technology Enhanced Learning, 3(1), 1. https://doi.org/10.24135/pjtel.v3i1.105

Video available soon.

 

Lam, L., Cochrane, T., Rajagopal, V., Davey, K., & John, S. (2021). Enhancing student learning through trans-disciplinary project-based assessment in bioengineering. Pacific Journal of Technology Enhanced Learning, 3(1), 4-5. https://doi.org/10.24135/pjtel.v3i1.80

Lam, Lionel; Cochrane, Thomas; RAJAGOPAL, VIJAYARAGHAVAN; DAVEY, CATHERINE; JOHN, SAM; SHAKTIVESH, SHAKTIVESH; et al. (2021): Enhancing student learning through trans-disciplinary project-based assessment in bioengineering. figshare. Media. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.13725631.v1

 

Cochrane, T., Coleman, K., Belton, A., Fitzgerald, E., Glasser, S., Harris, J., Melzack, G., Spreadborough, K., & Mactavish, K. (2021). #DataCreativities: Developing a trans-disciplinary data visualization framework from Arts practice to teaching and learning during COVID19. Pacific Journal of Technology Enhanced Learning, 3(1), 8-10. https://doi.org/10.24135/pjtel.v3i1.84

Cochrane, Thomas; COLEMAN, KATHRYN; Belton, Amanda; Fitzgerald, Emily; GLASSER, SOLANGE; Harris, Dr Julian Owen; et al. (2021): #DataCreativities: Developing a trans-disciplinary data visualization framework from Arts practice to teaching and learning during COVID19. figshare. Media. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.13726870.v1

 

Cochrane, T., Arkoudis, S., & Benevento, C. (2021). Collaborative Online Professional Development Design. Pacific Journal of Technology Enhanced Learning, 3(1), 11-12. https://doi.org/10.24135/pjtel.v3i1.85

Cochrane, Thomas; ARKOUDIS, SOPHIA; BENEVENTO, CATHLEEN (2021): Collaborative Online Professional Development Design. figshare. Media. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.13718725.v1

 

Aguayo, C., Cochrane, T., Aiello, S., & Wilkinson, N. (2021). Enhancing Immersiveness in Paramedicine Education XR Simulation Design. Pacific Journal of Technology Enhanced Learning, 3(1), 39-40. https://doi.org/10.24135/pjtel.v3i1.103

Aguayo, Claudio; Cochrane, Thomas; Aiello, Stephen; Wilkinson, Norm (2021): Enhancing Immersiveness in Paramedicine Education XR Simulation Design. figshare. Journal contribution. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.14055401.v2

 


The importance of sessions in online learning

Members of the Technology Enhanced Learning in Higher Education have examined an important (but often overlooked) aspect of online learning: sessions. Sessions are periods of time that students dedicate to complete several tasks related to their course.

In the paper entitled “The importance and meaning of session behaviour in a MOOC” published at Computers & Education, they found that how students organise their sessions over time – in terms of their length, distribution and content – is related to their use of self-regulated learning skills and to their overall success in the course.

This suggests that thinking of how students will engage with courses in terms of sessions (for example, how can they break activities into smaller tasks?) is an important aspect for teachers and learning designers to consider when making decisions about the structure of their subjects.

More details about the paper below:

One of the main challenges for online learners is knowing how to effectively manage their time. Highly autonomous settings, such as Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), put additional pressure on learners in this regard. However, little is known about how learners organise their time in terms of sessions or blocks of time across a MOOC. This study examined session behavioural data of 9272 learners in a MOOC and its relation to their engagement, grade and self-report data measuring aspects of self-regulated learning (SRL). From an exploratory temporal approach using clustering and group comparison tests, we examined how learners distributed sessions in relation to their length and frequency across the course (macro aspect), and which types of activities they prioritised within these sessions (micro aspect). We then investigated if these patterns of sessions were related to learners’ level of engagement, achievement and use of self-regulated learning (SRL) skills. We found that successful learners had more frequent and longer sessions across the course, mixed up activities within sessions, and changed the focus of activities within sessions across the course. In addition, session distribution was found to be a meaningful proxy for learners’ use of SRL skills related to time management and effort regulation. That is, learners with higher levels of time management and effort regulation had longer and more sessions across the course. Based on the results, implications for supporting specific session behaviours to promote effective learning in MOOCs are discussed.

Highlights:
• We used learning analytics to examine learners’ session behaviour patterns in a MOOC.
• We examined its relationship with engagement, achievement and self-regulated learning (SRL).
• Session distribution and activity were related to levels of engagement and achievement.
• Session distribution was found to be a meaningful proxy for learners’ use of SRL skills.
• Supporting specific session behaviours can potentially promote effective learning in MOOCs.

de Barba, P. G., Malekian, D., Oliveira, E. A., Bailey, J., Ryan, T., & Kennedy, G. (2020). The importance and meaning of session behaviour in a MOOC. Computers & Education, 146. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2019.103772


Episode6 of The New Normal Webinar Series

Join us for Episode6 of @MelbCSHE The New Normal Webinar series https://melbourne-cshe.unimelb.edu.au/resources/teaching-learning-and-assessment/the-new-normal-engaged-teaching-and-learning-webinar-series#episode6 This Friday 1pm AEDT with AAUT winner guest @Macowling & panel @cdeneen212 @briansology @CatManning @SiewFangLaw1 Reimagining Dual Delivery for a place-based University

This webinar series explores ways in which people and institutions are responding to and learning from the current crisis and applying these lessons into learning, teaching, technology and student engagement. The New Normal is a collaboration between Melbourne CSHE and Learning Environments. Panellists will include members of the Melbourne CSHE and Learning Environments teams, with some episodes featuring guest panellists from the University of Melbourne and the international Higher Education community.

Previous episodes:

  • Cochrane, Thomas; Deneen, Christopher; Law, Siew; MANNING, CATHERINE; Martin, Brian (2020): Episode Five: Student Engagement Online Part 2: Surface vs Deep. figshare. Media. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.13370333
  • Cochrane, Thomas; Deneen, Christopher; Law, Siew; MANNING, CATHERINE; Martin, Brian (2020): Episode Four: Student engagement: Meeting current needs and developing sustainable approaches. figshare. Media. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.13339223
  • Cochrane, Thomas; Deneen, Christopher; Law, Siew; MANNING, CATHERINE; Martin, Brian (2020): Episode Three: Myth-busting: Debunking the myths of online learning. figshare. Media. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.13339202
  • Cochrane, Thomas; Deneen, Christopher; Law, Siew; MANNING, CATHERINE; Martin, Brian (2020): Episode Two. From emergency to emergent practice: What we’ve learned about interaction and engagement. figshare. Media. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.13339148
  • Cochrane, Thomas; Deneen, Christopher; Law, Siew; MANNING, CATHERINE (2020): The New Normal Webinar Series: Episode One Online examinations: Challenges, assumptions and best practices. figshare. Media. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.13339157

Join us for the Scholarship of Technology Enhanced Learning Symposium #SOTELNZ tomorrow & Friday

The SoTEL 2021 Symposium is a two-day online virtual event with 6 Trendsetters/Keynotes, and over 20 expert presenters. See the program at https://sotel.nz now live & abstracts published at https://ojs.aut.ac.nz/pjtel/issue/view/5 Presentations include: @4DVirtualFarm https://doi.org/10.24135/pjtel.v3i1.100 @aiello_stephen https://doi.org/10.24135/pjtel.v3i1.89 @kateycoleman https://doi.org/10.24135/pjtel.v3i1.84 Lionel Lam https://doi.org/10.24135/pjtel.v3i1.80

@thomcochrane https://doi.org/10.24135/pjtel.v3i1.85

@caguyaoNZ https://doi.org/10.24135/pjtel.v3i1.103

 


Designing video feedback to support the socioemotional aspects of online learning

A member of the Technology-Enhanced Learning research group at Melbourne CSHE, Tracii Ryan, has authored a new journal article published in Educational Technology Research and Development.

The article, titled ‘Designing video feedback to support the socioemotional aspects of online learning‘ will be part of a forthcoming special issue – Shifting to digital: Informing the rapid development, deployment, and future of teaching and learning. The special issue features articles focused on the emergency shift to online learning caused by COVID19.

In this somewhat unusual special issue, authors were required to produce 500-1000 word responses to articles that had been previously published in Educational Technology Research and Development. The goal of these responses was to highlight how findings from the original article could be used to inform news ideas for flexible learning, online learning, and learning disruption.

Tracii’s article responds a 2015 paper by Borup, West and Thomas, titled, The impact of text versus video communication on instructor feedback in blended courses. Essentially, the response suggests that the provision of video feedback can support positive socioemotional outcomes in learners. It also highlights three design considerations for educators to consider when designing video feedback for online learners: content, timing and personalisation.

The abstract and citation for the new article are presented below.

The COVID-19 pandemic required instructors to rapidly redesign subject delivery for the online environment. In dealing with this emergency situation, instructors may have focused their energies primarily on transitioning learning and assessment activities to the online context rather than working to support the socioemotional aspects of learning, such as belonging and motivation. As a result, online classes may have lacked social presence, leaving students feeling unvalued and demotivated. Research findings by Borup, West, and Thomas (Educ Technol Res Dev 63(2):161–184, 2015) indicate that instructors may be able to support positive socioemotional outcomes for online students through the provision of video feedback comments. The purpose of this short response is to briefly review the work of Borup et al. (2015) and, in doing so, highlight three key design considerations relating to the creation and provision of video feedback comments in order to bolster socioemotional outcomes for online students. Limitations and implications for future research are also discussed, including cultural and inclusivity issues.

Ryan, T. (2021). Designing video feedback to support the socioemotional aspects of online learning. Educational Technology Research and Development, 1-4. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11423-020-09918-7


Number of posts found: 37