Category: Classics & Archaeology

  1. Kylix

    Kylix is a new student journal publishing work written and edited by students at the University of Melbourne. The journal provides an opportunity for undergraduate students of Classics and Ancient World Studies to gain experience in preparing work for publication and acts as a showcase of exemplary student work. Kylix seeks to publish exceptional and […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/shaps-research/2019/01/06/kylix

  2. Marguerite Johnson on Love Magic in the Ancient Mediterranean

    A lecture delivered by cultural historian Marguerite Johnson (University of Newcastle) for the 2017 SHAPS ‘Love’ Public Lecture Series. It was a well-kept secret among historians during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries that the practice of magic was widespread in the ancient Mediterranean. Historians wanted to keep the activity secret because it did […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/shaps-research/2017/01/01/under-your-spell

  3. Rebecca Clifton

    ‘Art and Identity in the Age of Akhenaten’ (PhD in Classics & Archaeology, 2019). In this thesis, I investigate expressions of identity in the art of the Amarna Period, focusing on two main areas: firstly, artistic representations of the royal family and the Aten and, secondly, artistic representations of Amarna’s elite within their tombs. I […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/shaps-research/2016/11/05/rebecca-clifton

  4. Alex Elliott

    ‘The Later Roman Naval Forces of the Northern Frontier, 3rd–5th Centuries CE’ (MA in Classics & Archaeology, 2019). This MA thesis provides an overview of the existence, distribution, and function of naval forces operating along the Northern Frontier of the Roman Empire from the third to fifth centuries CE. Despite the vast amount of research […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/shaps-research/2016/11/04/alex-elliot

  5. David Mouritz

    ‘East Greek Pottery and Graeco-Anatolian Mercenaries in the Southern Levant in Iron Age IIC (ca. 600 BCE)’ (PhD in Ancient World Studies, 2018). This thesis questions the current scholarly consensus that East Greek mercenaries were responsible for the late seventh-century BCE East Greek pottery found in the Southern Levant. It is argued that it is […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/shaps-research/2016/10/30/david-mouritz

  6. Marcia Nugent

    ‘Botanic Motifs of the Bronze Age Cycladic Islands: Identity, Belief, Ritual and Trade’ (PhD in Classics & Archaeology, 2019). This thesis argues the motifs with which we surround ourselves signify something – about us, our identities, our values and our understanding of the world. Frequently and infrequently represented motifs tell us something about the culture […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/shaps-research/2016/10/30/marcia-nugent

  7. Konstantine Panegyres

    ‘Problems in Greek Textual Criticism’ (MA in Classics & Archaeology, 2019). The thesis is written in the form of a traditional dissertation on textual criticism, namely with various isolated notes on select philological problems found in a wide number of ancient authors, from the Classical to the Byzantine period. Supervisor: Dr Hyun Jin Kim   […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/shaps-research/2016/10/29/konstantine-panegyres

  8. Emily Poelina-Hunter

    ‘Cycladic Sculptures Decorated with Abstract Painted Motifs: Representations of Tattooing in the Prehistoric Aegean’ (PhD in Classics & Archaeology, 2019). In historical literature pertaining to Cycladic sculptures, several writers suggest that some of the painted motifs on the surface of these marble sculptures may represent tattoos. This thesis seeks to undertake the first systematic research […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/shaps-research/2016/10/28/emily-poelina-hunter

  9. Annelies van de Ven

    ‘The Many Faces of the Cyrus Cylinder: Displaying Contested Objects as Constellations’ (PhD in Classics & Archaeology, 2018). Archaeological artefacts and sites are never just singular entities. Rather, they function as constellations, accruing various meanings and associations throughout their lives. For researchers as well as museum professionals, this polyphony challenges any straightforward reception, necessitating a […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/shaps-research/2016/10/23/annelies-van-de-ven

  10. Sharyn Volk

    “Ancient Egyptian and Nubian Funerary Figurines: Classification and Meaning” (PhD in Classics & Archaeology, 2019). Ancient Egyptian and Nubian funerary figurines are variously described as shabtis, shawabti(y)s and us(c)hebtis. A relationship has been established between the lexicon and the time of their manufacture and deposit. Shabti is first attested in the 13th dynasty and is […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/shaps-research/2016/10/23/sharyn-volk

Number of posts found: 81