pearg

  1. Q&A: Victoria’s monster mosquito explosion

    By Véronique Paris, Nick Bell and Professor Ary Hoffmann This article was first published on Pursuit. Read the original article. It’s evening and you’re just starting to relax after a hectic day. Just as you do, you hear the unmistakable high whine of a circling mosquito. It’s something most of us are used to in […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2022/11/24/qa-victorias-monster-mosquito-explosion

  2. Eddie Tsyrlin interviewed on ABC radio

    With all the wet weather in the South and East of Australia there is a surge in interest in the various insects enjoying the conditions. Here Eddie is interviewed on ABC Riverland, you can skip to 2:16:10 to hear the discussion.

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2022/11/24/eddie-tsyrlin-interviewed-on-abc-radio

  3. New DECRA projects coming soon! 2/2

    Molecular biosecurity: Genomic databanks for managing invasive pests – Tom Schmidt Insect pests frequently establish invasions in Australia or are detected as incursions at borders, but little is often known about where they’ve come from or how best to manage them now they are here. One way to investigate these questions is to sequence and […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2022/09/27/new-decra-projects-coming-soon-2-2

  4. New DECRA projects coming soon! 1/2

    Predicting the future threat of mosquitoes under climate change – Perran Stott-Ross Mosquitoes are major global pests, transmitting harmful pathogens to humans and livestock and causing significant nuisance biting. Climate change will lead to unprecedented temperature increases in Australia, shifting the habitats that are suitable for mosquitoes. Insects are capable of rapid evolution, but we […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2022/09/27/new-decra-projects-coming-soon-1-2

  5. The Scaptodrosophila, an Australian drosophilid genus

    Ann J. Stocker Scaptodrosophila are a diverse group of flies whose appearance is very similar to the widespread and widely studied Drosophila. The genus is estimated to have diverged within the drosophilid lineage during the Cretaceous period about 70 million years ago. It was originally considered a subgenus of Drosophila and called Pholadoris in earlier […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2022/05/09/the-scaptodrosophila-an-australian-drosophilid-genus

  6. Dengue-blocking mosquitoes here to stay

    This article was first published on Pursuit. Read the original article. Dr Perran Stott-Ross Story Producer: Nerissa Hannink Dengue fever and other mosquito-borne diseases remain a massive threat to human health and wellbeing. Urbanisation and climate change are likely to increase this threat as established mosquitoes spread to new environments and gain a foothold. Eradicating […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2022/04/12/dengue-blocking-mosquitoes-here-to-stay

  7. A brief word from Ary Hoffmann on genetic rescue in Eastern Barred Bandicoots

    Further details herehere  

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2022/03/31/a-brief-word-from-ary-hoffmann-on-genetic-rescue-in-eastern-barred-bandicoots

  8. Mini-beast renaturing: A time for local action

    This article was first published on Pursuit. Read the original article. Dr Michael Magrath, Dr Steve Sinclair, Hiromi Yagui, Professor Ary Hoffmann and Professor Michael Kearney Insects in our environment are unsung heroes. These ‘mini-beasts’ are often inconspicuous, but they may have a huge impact on the health of ecosystems that sustain humanity. They pollinate […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2021/11/08/mini-beast-renaturing-a-time-for-local-action

  9. Finding a common name for the matchstick grasshopper Vandiemenella viatica

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    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2021/10/20/finding-a-common-name-for-vandiemenella-viatica

  10. Male mosquitoes don’t want your blood, but they still find you very attractive

    Original article published in The Conversation The Conversation Perran Ross, The University of Melbourne The whine of the mosquito is unpleasant and often inescapable outdoors on summer evenings. Mosquitoes track you down from tens of metres away by sensing carbon dioxide in the air you breathe out. Within seconds, they home in on exposed skin […]

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2021/09/29/male-mosquitoes-dont-want-your-blood-but-they-still-find-you-very-attractive

Number of posts found: 100