Posted under Research

  1. New publication | Fine-scale landscape genomics helps explain the slow spatial spread of Wolbachia through the Aedes aegypti population in Cairns, Australia

    Author summary and figures by Tom Schmidt Wolbachia is a bacterium that suppresses the capacity for arbovirus transmission in the mosquito Aedes aegypti, and can spread spatially through …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/05/25/new-publication-fine-scale-landscape-genomics-helps-explain-the-slow-spatial-spread-of-wolbachia-through-the-aedes-aegypti-population-in-cairns-australia

  2. NEW PROJECT | Buruli ulcer

    Words and photo: Jason Axford On 26 April at the Peter Doherty Institute, Federal Minister for Health, Greg Hunt, announced new NHMRC funding to investigate the …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/05/10/new-project-buruli-ulcer

  3. Biology of the babushkas

    Words: Samantha Ward As the name suggests, at the Pest & Environmental Adaptation Research Group we are interested in pest species and enjoy investigating novel approaches …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/05/10/biology-of-the-babushkas

  4. Ambiguous literature | kdr triple resistance mutation – Where has it really been found?

    Editors note: This article is direct from our internal research diary Words: Nancy M. Endersby-Harshman The purpose of this article is to recommend very careful reading …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/05/04/ambiguos-literature-kdr-triple-resistance-mutation-where-has-it-really-been-found

  5. Rapid evolution in insect pest species

    Off the back of a review Ary wrote last year in Current Opinion in Insect Science, a less technical and more digestible summary is now available …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/04/30/rapid-evolution-in-insect-pest-species

  6. Collecting fresh mosquitoes | PEARG in the field

    Words: Tom Schmidt Photos: Tom Schmidt and Perran Ross At PEARG, we have a great interest in environmental pests and how to deal with them. One …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/04/30/collecting-fresh-mosquitoes-pearg-in-the-field

  7. The Wolbachia pandemic | Symbionts spread rapidly across highly diverged flies

    Photo by Dr Andrew Weeks CC BY-SA 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

    Words: Perran Ross Cover photo: Andrew Weeks Wolbachia are perhaps the most prevalent bacterial symbionts on earth. Of the millions of insect species, Wolbachia are estimated …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/04/16/the-wolbachia-pandemic-symbionts-spread-rapidly-across-highly-diverged-flies

  8. WOLBACHIA BACTERIA IN ACTION | How we’re using naturally occurring bacteria to stop mosquitoes from spreading disease

    Words and images: Perran Ross Cover photo: Jason Axford Dengue is a major global health issue. It infects millions of people every year and can cause …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/04/13/wolbachia-bacteria-in-action-how-were-using-naturally-occurring-bacteria-to-stop-mosquitoes-from-spreading-disease

  9. New review | The detection and significance of emerging insecticide resistance in mosquitoes

    http://microbiology.publish.csiro.au/?paper=MA18022

    Nancy, Andrew and Ary have a fresh review article in CSIRO’s ‘Microbiology Australia’ journal. Below is the abstract, for the full text please follow this link. …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/04/11/new-review-the-detection-and-significance-of-emerging-insecticide-resistance-in-mosquitoes

  10. What’s in a (species) name? Using genetics to map the hidden diversity of earwigs

    By Ryan Hodnett [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

    Written by Oliver Stuart, Image credit: Ryan Hodnett [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], from Wikimedia Commons There are a lot of different insects; this cannot be overstated. …

    blogs.unimelb.edu.au/pearg/2018/04/11/whats-in-a-species-name-using-genetics-to-map-the-hidden-diversity-of-earwigs

Number of posts found: 44